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As far as I know, when I use Linq, NHibernate supports some operators and will convert them to the appropriate SQL. For example, when I create a query like this

q => q.Where(foo => foo.Eligibility > 0)
                    .OrderBy(foo => foo.Eligibility);

It will in theory perform the where and order by in the SQL appropriately.

Now, if I am trying to query this:

q => q.Where(foo => foo.Eligibility > 0)
                    .Except(blacklistedFoos)
                    .OrderBy(foo => foo.Eligibility);

It gives me an error (v2.0.50727 we use in the production) because the operator except is not supported.

Now if I create a HashSet blacklistedFooSet to handle this,

q => q.Where(foo => foo.Eligibility > 0)
                .Where(foo=> !blacklistedFooSet.Contains(foo))
                .OrderBy(foo => foo.Eligibility);

What will happen? Will NHibernate translate the first where and the orderby correctly and then manually perform the other where outside the database? What is the general rule for unsupported operator/clause?

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3 Answers 3

LINQ statements follow deferred execution and won't actually run until you enumerate the query (i.e. foreach loop). Since you never enumerate in your provided code, it will attempt to translate everything into SQL whenever you do, barring any bugs in NHibernateLINQ (of which there are many). NHibernate does support (maybe not your version though) .Contains of up to 1000 or so elements I believe, so it might work. If you enumerate your query like this though:

q => q.Where(foo => foo.Eligibility > 0).ToList()
            .Where(foo=> !blacklistedFooSet.Contains(foo))
            .OrderBy(foo => foo.Eligibility);

Then the second .Where and the .OrderBy will be executed in your .NET application.

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In cases like this there is one way to find out and that is to use a profiling tool like NHProf to see the actual SQL generated. It is really easy to use and I find it a must when trying to work out what the NH Linq provider can do.

Also it is worth mentioning that NHibernate 3.3 will be released soon which has had lots of LINQ bug fixes, issues, enhancements sorted. If you can't wait then you can pull the lastest source from GitHub

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I looked at the log and it seems that the unsupported Where that I put gets changed to NOT (1=0) in the SQL. Do you know what's going on here? –  Louis Rhys Feb 28 '12 at 7:44
    
What version of NH are you using? Did you try if from the latest source in trunk? –  Rippo Feb 28 '12 at 13:06
    
To downvoter, please can you comment why this is a -1? –  Rippo Feb 28 '12 at 18:11

For making experiments like this and understanding what is really going on SQL when I'm querying something with LINQ I'm using LINQPad. This is a great soft that translates your LINQ queries in SQL and shows you what is really happening. Try it maybe it can help.

http://www.linqpad.net/

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