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i am new to Perl so excuse my noobness,

Here's what i intend to do.

$ perl dirComp.pl dir1 dir2

dir1 & dir2 are directory names.

The script dirComp.pl should identify whether contents in dir1 & dir2 are identical or not.

I have come up with an algorithm

Store all the contents of dir1(recursively) in a list
Store all the contents of dir2 in another list
Compare the two list, if they are same - dir1 & dir2 are same else not.

my @files1 = readdir(DIR1h);
my @files2 = readdir(DIR2h);

    # Remove filename extensions for each list.

        foreach my $item (@files1) {
        my ( $fileName, $filePath, $fileExt ) = fileparse($item, qr/\.[^.]*/);
        $item = $fileName;
        }


        foreach my $item (@files2) {
        my ( $fileName, $filePath, $fileExt ) = fileparse($item, qr/\.[^.]*/);
        $item = $fileName;
        }

I am not able to recursively traverse subdirectories in a given directory with the help of above code. Any help would be appreciated.

EDIT: Using File:DirCompare

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use File::DirCompare;
use File::Basename;

if ($#ARGV < 1 )
{
        &usage;
}

my $dir1 = $ARGV[0];
my $dir2 = $ARGV[1];

File::DirCompare->compare($dir1,$dir2,sub {
        my ($a,$b) = @_;
        if ( !$b )
        {
                printf "Test result:PASSED.\n";
                printf "Only in %s : %s\n", dirname($a), basename($a);
        }elsif ( !$a ) {
                printf "Test result:PASSED.\n";
                printf "Only in %s : %s\n", dirname($b), basename($b);
        }else {
                printf "Test result:FAILED.\n";
                printf "Files $a and $b are different.\n";
        }
});

I have a directory structure as below,

dir1/                  dir2/
    --file1.txt            --file1.txt
    --file2.txt            --file2.txt
    --file3.cpp            --file3.cpp

I am facing Test result:FAILED. As the result must have been passed. Can anyone please correct me?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

The example you supplied using File::DirCompare works as intended.

Keep in mind that the callback subroutine is called for every unique file in each directory and for every pair of files which differ in their content. Having the same filename is not enough, the contents of each file in each directory must be exactly the same as well.

Furthermore, the cases in which you report "PASSED" aren't a success at all (by your definition) since they detail the cases in which a file exists in one of the directories, but not the other: meaning the directories' contents are not identical.

This should be closer to what you want:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::DirCompare;
use File::Basename;

sub compare_dirs
{
  my ($dir1, $dir2) = @_;
  my $equal = 1;

  File::DirCompare->compare($dir1, $dir2, sub {
    my ($a,$b) = @_;
    $equal = 0; # if the callback was called even once, the dirs are not equal

    if ( !$b )
    {
      printf "File '%s' only exists in dir '%s'.\n", basename($a), dirname($a);
    }
    elsif ( !$a ) {
      printf "File '%s' only exists in dir '%s'.\n", basename($b), dirname($b);
    }
    else
    {
      printf "File contents for $a and $b are different.\n";
    }
  });

  return $equal;
}

print "Please specify two directory names\n" and exit if (@ARGV < 2);
printf "%s\n", &compare_dirs($ARGV[0], $ARGV[1]) ? 'Test: PASSED' : 'Test: FAILED';
share|improve this answer

I'd recommend using File::DirCompare module instead. ) It takes all the hard work of traversing the directory structure - you just need to define how your directories should be checked (should the sub compare the file contents, etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
I am essentially trying to emulate diff -r command of UNIX is it? –  Kelly Feb 28 '12 at 8:49

You might want to try the ol' File::Find. It's not my favorite module. (It is just funky in the way it works), but for your purposes, it allows you to easily find all files in two directories, and compare them. Here's a brief example:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);
use Digest::MD5::File qw(file_md5_hex);

use File::Find;

use constant {
    DIR_1 => "/usr/foo",
    DIR_2 => "/usr/bar",
};

my %dir_1;
my %dir_2;

find ( sub {
        if ( -f $File::Find::name ) {
            $dir_1{$File::Find::name} = file_md5_hex($File::Find::name);
        }
        else {
            $dir_1($file::Find::name} = "DIRECTORY!";
        }
    }, DIR_1);

find ( sub {
        if ( -f $File::Find::name ) {
            $dir_2{$File::Find::name} = file_md5_hex($File::Find::name);
        }
        else {
            $dir_2($file::Find::name} = "DIRECTORY!";
        }
    }, DIR_2);

This will create two hashes keyed by the file names in each directory. I used the Digest::MD5::File to create a MD5 checksum. If the checksum between the two files differ, I know the files differ (although I don't know where).

Now you have to do three things:

  1. Go through %dir_1 and see if there's an equivalent key in %dir_2. If there is not an equivalent key, you know that a file exists in %dir_1 and not %dir_2.
  2. If there an equivalent key in each hash, check to see if the md5 checksums agree. If they do, then, the files match. If they don't they differ. You can't say where they differ, but they differ.
  3. Finally, go through %dir_2 and check to see if there's an equivalent key in %dir_1. If there is, do nothing. If there isn't, that means there's a file in %dir_1 that's not in %dir_2.

Just a word of warning: The keys int these two hashes won't match. You'll have to transform one to the other when doing your compare. For example, you'll have two files as:

/usr/bar/my/file/is/here.txt
/usr/foo/my/file/is/here.txt

As you can see, my/file/is/here.txt exist in both directories, but in my code, the two hashes will have two different keys. You could either fix the two subroutines to strip the directory name off the front of the files paths, or when you do your comparison, transform one to the other. I didn't want to run through a full test. (The bit of code I wrote works in my testing), so I'm not 100% sure what you'll have to do to make sure you find the matching keys.

Oh, another warning: I pick up all entries and not just files. For directories, I can check to see if the hash key is equal to DIRECTORY! or not. I could simply ignore everything that's not a file.

And, you might want to check for special cases. Is this a link? Is it a hard link or a soft link? What about some sort of special file. That makes things a bit more complex. However, the basics are here.

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