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I want to know if there is a way to specify that in multiple inheritence, one of the base-classes virtual functions becomes the single virtual definition. They only way I see to do this is by writing an explicit definition of this function in the derived class and explicitly call one of the base classes. This is cumbersome, and I was hoping using might help, but it doesn't.

For example, in the below code, I have to define a C::value even though I just wish to forward to the class B version. Is there not a simpler way?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct A
{
    virtual char const * value() const
    { return "A"; }
};

struct B
{
    virtual char const * value() const
    { return "B"; }
};

class C : public A, public B
{
public:
    //using B::value;
    virtual char const * value() const
    { return B::value(); }
};

int main()
{
    C obj;
    cout << obj.value() << endl;

    A * ptr = &obj;
    cout << ptr->value() << endl;
}

Some notes:

  • in this particular case virtual inheritance of class A is not an option for Class B -- I need a proper construction chain down to the base
  • In theory struct B could also be used unrelated to A, but that is not the case here (in case that provides other options)
  • value may be marked as pure virtual if that somehow helps, but I don't believe it does.
  • there are other classes which derive from A but not B
  • to be clear, however "func" is called on C, through any type pointer, must result in "B"

I suspect the answer might be "No", but some confirmation would be good. It feels like the language should support this pattern.

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What is the output of the above program? –  Bingo Feb 28 '12 at 8:35
    
Maybe you can add a dummy 'node' to the inheritance tree (e.g. DummyC which virtually inherits from A, and C which inherits from DummyC and B). Not sure it's possible, but take a look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3310910/… and see if this helps. –  Asaf Feb 28 '12 at 8:45
    
@Bingo, the above program outputs "B" and "B" because I override the function. If you don't do this, just do the using declartion you will get "B" and "A". –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 28 '12 at 8:48
    
@Asaf, that gives me an idea that perhaps just sticking the "value" function in a dummy virtually inherited base class without a constructor. That would probably work. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 28 '12 at 8:51
    
@Asaf, well, my idea doesn't work, it still wants a final overrider. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 28 '12 at 8:53
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only way I see to do this is by writing an explicit definition of this function in the derived class ..., and I was hoping using might help

using keyword in your context is used only to bring the names into the current scope (used against name hiding). Assume that your requested feature is already there. Now see the below modified codes:

struct A
{
  virtual char const * value() const
  { return "A"; }

  void value (double);  // new function
};

class C : public A, public B
{
public:
  using B::value;
  void value(int);  // new function
};

Suppose we have functions of the same name as value(int) in C and value(double) in A. These 2 functions have nothing to do with virtual value() and are used with object of C.

How will you use A::value(double) with C's object ? Naturally you have to do using A::value; in body of C. Now because of this, as a side effect we have 2 virtual function match: A::value() const and B::value() const!
Which to choose when called with A* or B* ?

This is only one example, but there can be other problems too. Whatever you have mentioned in your question is the best way to accomplish the correct result. It explicitly says that C::value() const is a wrapper around B::value() const.

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No. There is no other way of doing it other than explicit call to the function using the binary scope resolution operator::.

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Multiple inheritance is so rare, and the cost of writing such a function so trivial, that it's not worth a language feature, and I certainly know of none that provide such functionality.

The only thing using affects is visibility, which is not the issue here, so it most certainly cannot be of any help.

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While your note on visiblity is correct, I don't consider multiple inheritence is rare. Indeed if this pattern was supported it might be more common. Additionally, languages like Python and Ruby can do such things, so it can't be discounted outright as "not worth it". –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 28 '12 at 8:50
    
@edA-qamort-ora-y: Why not? Those other languages are utterly irrelevant. "Worth it" is "Worth it for C++ in the C++ Standard Committee's opinion". Where is Ruby or Python mentioned in there? Nowhere. MI is, wisely, avoided by most programmers, and this is an absolutely miniscule drop compared to the ocean of other problems MI suffers and the trivial solution of simply defining a trivial forwarding function. –  Puppy Feb 28 '12 at 10:20
    
IME, mixins are far from rare. –  ildjarn Mar 3 '12 at 0:26
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It's always better to have interface methods as non-virtual. The code below would help you in acheiving what you want. But, the output varies. I believe that is what should be.
The code can be found here

Output:

B

A

#include <iostream> 

using namespace std; 

struct A 
{ 
    char const* value() const
    {
        return valueImpl();
    }
protected:
    virtual char const * valueImpl() const 
    { return "A"; } 
}; 

struct B 
{ 
    char const* value() const
    {
        return valueImpl();
    }
protected:
    virtual char const * valueImpl() const 
    { return "B"; } 
}; 

class C : public A, public B 
{ 
public:
   using B::value;

}; 

int main() 
{ 
    C obj; 
    cout << obj.value() << endl; 

    A * ptr = &obj; 
    cout << ptr->value() << endl; 
}
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I don't want output "B" "A", I want "B" "B", there should be only one value() defined and accessible for the resulting object. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 28 '12 at 10:36
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