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I'm using the awesome https://github.com/tpope/vim-surround plugin to surround words with parenthesis, for example I often use: viws<space><space> to surround a word with spaces.

What I'm missing is the opposite of this, that is, deleting surrounding spaces around a word.

The most common use for me is function arguments like foo(bar) vs foo( bar ) depending on code style.

Does anyone know a nice way to do this?

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Does ds<space> work? The README provides ds" as a mechanism to remove the " delimiters on an example. –  sarnold Feb 28 '12 at 10:53
    
It does not unfortunately. Good observation though. –  Andreas Fliesberg Feb 28 '12 at 11:05
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I find it funny that you find the viws<space><space> command to be a simpler solution than all the alternatives, including using the arrow keys and backspace! –  puk Feb 28 '12 at 11:36
    
hmm..yeah..never thought about it... funny how peoples brains work differently :) –  Andreas Fliesberg Feb 29 '12 at 11:03
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Note: This solution requires the surround plugin referenced in the question.

For your specific situation you could do the following:

cs()

This changes foo( bar ) to foo(bar), however, it is not a general solution to your problem.

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kind of elegant.. weird but elegant :) –  Andreas Fliesberg Feb 28 '12 at 11:56
    
what is that supposed to do? It does nothing for me –  puk Feb 28 '12 at 12:14
    
If you don't have the surround plugin noted in the OP then it won't do what is expected. With surround, csXY says to "change the surrounding characters X with surrounding characters Y", the ( is defined as "surrounding parentheses with a padding space", and the ) is defined as "surrounding parentheses without a padding space". –  Randy Morris Feb 28 '12 at 12:23
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In fact, perfect solution for me is the mapping provided by @puk, but using the keys @sarnold expected in the first place (what one would expect from surround plugin if it implemented this).

This is:

nnoremap ds<space> F<space>xf<space>x
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I often productively procrastinate in search of vim plugins too, when I could just define a mapping for this.

nnoremap <leader>dd F<space>xf<space>x

EDIT more information

  • <leader> common key for user defined mappings (, is a good one)

  • dd combination to use (any other mnemonic one will suffice)

  • F<space>x search backwards for a space, then remove it

  • f<space>x search forwards for a space, then remove it

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haha... yeah... :) –  Andreas Fliesberg Feb 28 '12 at 11:57
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Maybe just BXElx in normal mode.

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or BXf<space>x –  puk Feb 28 '12 at 11:25
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