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I want to insert 10000 records in a table and i am currently writing this code in sql server 2005

declare @n decimal(10,0);
set @n = 0;
while ( @n < 10000)
begin
   insert into table1 values (@n+1)
   set @n = @n + 1
end

in the above code insert command performs 10000 times is there any single command exists to do so.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Also you can use sys objects to your advantage:

INSERT INTO table1(n)
SELECT TOP 10000 ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY a.object_id) AS n FROM sys.objects a CROSS JOIN sys.objects b
GO
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+1 Just what I was about to post :) –  AdaTheDev Feb 28 '12 at 11:05
    
This will obviously only work if sysobjects has enough rows to cartesian-join itself and give enough rows. If you want to use this for 10 million rows, you might want to cross join itself a couple more times. –  cairnz Feb 28 '12 at 12:56

You could use a CTE to create an in-memory table of 10000 items and use this to insert into your actual table.

;WITH q (n) AS (
   SELECT 1
   UNION ALL
   SELECT n + 1
   FROM   q
   WHERE  n < 10000
)
INSERT INTO table1 
SELECT * FROM q
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0)
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A quick way (from HERE):

declare @t table (number int)
insert into @t 
    select 0
    union all
    select 1
    union all
    select 2
    union all
    select 3
    union all
    select 4
    union all
    select 5
    union all
    select 6
    union all
    select 7
    union all
    select 8
    union all
    select 9

insert into numbers
    select
        t1.number + t2.number*10 + t3.number*100
    from
        @t as t1, 
        @t as t2,
        @t as t3
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