Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If you create a class with one pure virtual for example, but one or more non-pure virtual functions, can you skip creating the implementation file and therefore the definition of the class?

Is this the same if there is a non-virtual function? I'm guessing no...

share|improve this question
1  
I think you don't actually need to define any declared member function (be it virtual or not) as long as you don't try to call them. Then the linker would complain. Is that what you're asking? –  jrok Feb 28 '12 at 11:31
    
Kind of. basically I just wanted to know if you can always completely skip defining abstract classes since you will never instantiate one anyway. –  SirYakalot Feb 28 '12 at 14:35
    
You can, likewise you also completely can skip defining non-abstract class ;) Don't forget that you can't instance abstract class, but you can have a pointer to it. –  Alecs Feb 28 '12 at 17:12

3 Answers 3

You can always make classes header-only by defining all member functions inline. This is not related whether a function is virtual or not. Furthermore, the header file almost always already contains the class definition (unless you're using a forward declaration).

To clarify the terminology:

Class declaration:

class C;

Class definition with one member function:

class C {
  void f();
};

Class definition with one member function that is defined inline:

class C {
  void f() { ... }
};

All three styles are possible and useful in different situations. For class templates, you often use the third style to allow arbitrary instantiations. For ordinary classes with a lot of code, the second style is prevalent because it reduces object code size and compile time.

share|improve this answer

Until you don't call any members, you don't need to have their declarations, even if your class isn't abstract.

it's a good way to forbid some operators - make them private and without declaration, to be sure that this operator won't be used with this class.

share|improve this answer

You shouldn't create definition for pure virtual function in the base class but you should create definition for regular function. Defining pure virtual method in the base class doesn't make any sense.

Also if a class is an Abstract class(i.e. if it consists of pure virtual function), it must be inherited. Also we cannot create object for an Abstract Class.

Edited Part:

class A{
public:
    int a;

    virtual void vDisplay() = 0; //Should not be defined in base class and must be defined in the derived class
    virtual int vGet(); //non pure Virtual function 
    void vSetA(int x); //non virtual member function must be defined
};
class B:public A{
    int b;
public:
    void vDisplay(); //should be defined in derived class
    int vGet();
    void vSetB(int x,int y);
};
int A::vGet(){
    return a;
}
void A::vSetA(int x){
    a = x;
}
void B::vDisplay(){
    cout<<"a="<<a<<"b="<<b;
}
int B::vGet(){
    return a;
}
void B::vSetB(int x, int y){
    a = x;
    b = y;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm pretty sure although it's very much against convention, you can in fact create definitions for pure-virtuals. –  SirYakalot Feb 28 '12 at 11:22
    
@SirYakalot: As per the convention, one should not define pure virtual function in the base class. –  Abhineet Feb 28 '12 at 11:30
    
You can't define pure virtuals inside the class body, but you can do void A::vDisplay() { }. Something you in fact need to do if you want to have pure virtual destructor. –  jrok Feb 28 '12 at 11:38
    
@jrok: You can create outside or inside the class body. But defining pure virtual method outside or inside the class body makes no sense, if we exclude the topic about pure virtual destructor. –  Abhineet Feb 28 '12 at 11:43
2  
It (very) occasionally makes sense to define a pure virtual function, for example so that derived classes can call it from their implementation of the function. When that happens, you might just as well define a separate function default_X or base_X for the derived class to call instead. But calling it X provides that little bit more consistency between direct children of this class and children-of-children calling their parent's implementation. Of course there are coding styles in which this strictly never arises, for example if you never use inheritance for code-sharing. –  Steve Jessop Feb 28 '12 at 12:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.