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I have a situation where I would like to be able to rate a users password in the web interface to my system, so that before they hit submit they know if they have a bad password.

Key Requirements:

  • Must be able to rate the password, not just pass/fail.
  • Should disable the form if the password is below a threshhold, so the user can't submit it.
  • Look nice. :)
  • Not use jQuery - we're currently using Mochikit and Y!UI in this system.

I've found many password meters written in jQuery, and things like http://www.passwordmeter.com/ that are too verbose.

Can anyone suggest a good drop in javascript password rater I can use, or give an example of how to write one?

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closed as not constructive by Bo Persson, ThinkingStiff, Sudarshan, Peter DeWeese, Gabriele Petronella Jan 26 '13 at 2:18

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1  
so what's the question? –  Can Berk Güder Jun 4 '09 at 1:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here's a collection of scripts: http://webtecker.com/2008/03/26/collection-of-password-strength-scripts/

And this one uses Prototype/Scriptaculous: http://ajaxorized.com/?p=14

I think both of them rate the password and don't use jQuery... but I don't know if they have native support for disabling the form?

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3  
Remember, even if you disable the form in javascript, you should run this check on the server-side as well. Tricksy users will just do form submits anyway, or what if a user has javascript disabled? –  Chris Kaminski Jun 4 '09 at 4:56
    
You should also note that users are only tricking themselves. Don't sure if you need to protect users from that ... –  Marco W. Apr 18 at 19:04

Update: created a js fiddle here to see it live: http://jsfiddle.net/HFMvX/

I went through tons of google searches and didn't find anything satisfying. i like how passpack have done it so essentially reverse-engineered their approach, here we go:

function scorePassword(pass) {
    var score = 0;
    if (!pass)
        return score;

    // award every unique letter until 5 repetitions
    var letters = new Object();
    for (var i=0; i<pass.length; i++) {
        letters[pass[i]] = (letters[pass[i]] || 0) + 1;
        score += 5.0 / letters[pass[i]];
    }

    // bonus points for mixing it up
    var variations = {
        digits: /\d/.test(pass),
        lower: /[a-z]/.test(pass),
        upper: /[A-Z]/.test(pass),
        nonWords: /\W/.test(pass),
    }

    variationCount = 0;
    for (var check in variations) {
        variationCount += (variations[check] == true) ? 1 : 0;
    }
    score += (variationCount - 1) * 10;

    return parseInt(score);
}

Good passwords start to score around 60 or so, here's function to translate that in words:

function checkPassStrength(pass) {
    var score = scorePassword(pass);
    if (score > 80)
        return "strong";
    if (score > 60)
        return "good";
    if (score >= 30)
        return "weak";

    return "";
}

you might want to tune this a bit but i found it working for me nicely

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4  
+1 because this method rates the passwords the same way zxcvbn does, but with much less code: qwER43@! => scores 70 = good, Tr0ub4dour&3 => scores 80 = strong, correcthorsebatterystaple => scores 86 = strong. –  Julien Kronegg Mar 6 '13 at 7:12
    
I tuned it by giving restriction on nonWord characters awarded (because RACF restricts special characters to @#$) and allowed up to 30% occurences of the same character without score reduction as proposed by geodsoft.com/howto/password/pwcheck_instructions.htm –  Julien Kronegg Mar 20 '13 at 11:58
    
how can I tune it such, that alphabetical or numeric sequences like abcde... or 12345... are punished by minus score? –  abimelex Jun 14 '13 at 9:27
    
@abimelex - i think you are misreading the code, each unique symbol gets 5 points and then it's value diminishes with each repetition. i updated the answer to include a live example jsfiddle.net/HFMvX –  tm_lv Jun 25 '13 at 8:54
1  
I've rewritten this function in PHP for checking the score on the server too: pastie.org/8889985 –  MacroMan Mar 7 at 15:28
Password Strength Algorithm:

Password Length:
    5 Points: Less than 4 characters
    10 Points: 5 to 7 characters
    25 Points: 8 or more

Letters:
    0 Points: No letters
    10 Points: Letters are all lower case
    20 Points: Letters are upper case and lower case

Numbers:
    0 Points: No numbers
    10 Points: 1 number
    20 Points: 3 or more numbers

Characters:
    0 Points: No characters
    10 Points: 1 character
    25 Points: More than 1 character

Bonus:
    2 Points: Letters and numbers
    3 Points: Letters, numbers, and characters
    5 Points: Mixed case letters, numbers, and characters

Password Text Range:

    >= 90: Very Secure
    >= 80: Secure
    >= 70: Very Strong
    >= 60: Strong
    >= 50: Average
    >= 25: Weak
    >= 0: Very Weak

Settings Toggle to true or false, if you want to change what is checked in the password

var m_strUpperCase = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
var m_strLowerCase = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
var m_strNumber = "0123456789";
var m_strCharacters = "!@#$%^&*?_~"

Check password


function checkPassword(strPassword)
{
    // Reset combination count
    var nScore = 0;

    // Password length
    // -- Less than 4 characters
    if (strPassword.length < 5)
    {
        nScore += 5;
    }
    // -- 5 to 7 characters
    else if (strPassword.length > 4 && strPassword.length < 8)
    {
        nScore += 10;
    }
    // -- 8 or more
    else if (strPassword.length > 7)
    {
        nScore += 25;
    }

    // Letters
    var nUpperCount = countContain(strPassword, m_strUpperCase);
    var nLowerCount = countContain(strPassword, m_strLowerCase);
    var nLowerUpperCount = nUpperCount + nLowerCount;
    // -- Letters are all lower case
    if (nUpperCount == 0 && nLowerCount != 0) 
    { 
        nScore += 10; 
    }
    // -- Letters are upper case and lower case
    else if (nUpperCount != 0 && nLowerCount != 0) 
    { 
        nScore += 20; 
    }

    // Numbers
    var nNumberCount = countContain(strPassword, m_strNumber);
    // -- 1 number
    if (nNumberCount == 1)
    {
        nScore += 10;
    }
    // -- 3 or more numbers
    if (nNumberCount >= 3)
    {
        nScore += 20;
    }

    // Characters
    var nCharacterCount = countContain(strPassword, m_strCharacters);
    // -- 1 character
    if (nCharacterCount == 1)
    {
        nScore += 10;
    }   
    // -- More than 1 character
    if (nCharacterCount > 1)
    {
        nScore += 25;
    }

    // Bonus
    // -- Letters and numbers
    if (nNumberCount != 0 && nLowerUpperCount != 0)
    {
        nScore += 2;
    }
    // -- Letters, numbers, and characters
    if (nNumberCount != 0 && nLowerUpperCount != 0 && nCharacterCount != 0)
    {
        nScore += 3;
    }
    // -- Mixed case letters, numbers, and characters
    if (nNumberCount != 0 && nUpperCount != 0 && nLowerCount != 0 && nCharacterCount != 0)
    {
        nScore += 5;
    }


    return nScore;
}

// Runs password through check and then updates GUI 


function runPassword(strPassword, strFieldID) 
{
    // Check password
    var nScore = checkPassword(strPassword);


     // Get controls
        var ctlBar = document.getElementById(strFieldID + "_bar"); 
        var ctlText = document.getElementById(strFieldID + "_text");
        if (!ctlBar || !ctlText)
            return;

        // Set new width
        ctlBar.style.width = (nScore*1.25>100)?100:nScore*1.25 + "%";

    // Color and text
    // -- Very Secure
    /*if (nScore >= 90)
    {
        var strText = "Very Secure";
        var strColor = "#0ca908";
    }
    // -- Secure
    else if (nScore >= 80)
    {
        var strText = "Secure";
        vstrColor = "#7ff67c";
    }
    // -- Very Strong
    else 
    */
    if (nScore >= 80)
    {
        var strText = "Very Strong";
        var strColor = "#008000";
    }
    // -- Strong
    else if (nScore >= 60)
    {
        var strText = "Strong";
        var strColor = "#006000";
    }
    // -- Average
    else if (nScore >= 40)
    {
        var strText = "Average";
        var strColor = "#e3cb00";
    }
    // -- Weak
    else if (nScore >= 20)
    {
        var strText = "Weak";
        var strColor = "#Fe3d1a";
    }
    // -- Very Weak
    else
    {
        var strText = "Very Weak";
        var strColor = "#e71a1a";
    }

    if(strPassword.length == 0)
    {
    ctlBar.style.backgroundColor = "";
    ctlText.innerHTML =  "";
    }
else
    {
    ctlBar.style.backgroundColor = strColor;
    ctlText.innerHTML =  strText;
}
}

// Checks a string for a list of characters
function countContain(strPassword, strCheck)
{ 
    // Declare variables
    var nCount = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < strPassword.length; i++) 
    {
        if (strCheck.indexOf(strPassword.charAt(i)) > -1) 
        { 
                nCount++;
        } 
    } 

    return nCount; 
} 

You can customize by yourself according to your requirement.

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3  
@garrow: What's wrong with the coding style other than being different from yours? (FTR, it not the style I prefer either, but so what?) –  Lawrence Dol Jun 4 '09 at 6:35
    
Do you know origin of this given approach? –  Free Consulting Jul 28 '10 at 9:59
2  
what happened to "2 numbers" ? :) –  Nicholas Apr 10 '13 at 12:34
2  
Let's try a test case! Bill's password is "123&$aA", about 40 bits of entropy according to wikipedia. Your algorithm gives it a score of 80. Alice's password is "eriahrieudfklsvhnsreuilvnreuhgsldhhvf", about 160 bits or entropy. Your algorithm ranks it 35. Just to be clear, plugging those two passwords into grc.com/haystack.htm gives us 0.7 seconds to crack vs 74.72 thousand trillion trillion centuries. –  Ziggy May 23 at 19:51
2  
Seriously though. You aren't at all concerned that your many times up-voted answer is going to suggest weaker passwords over stronger ones? People will copy paste this! –  Ziggy Jun 17 at 22:52

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