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Suppose I have an XML document with 2 namespace declarations having the prefix foo, like so:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root xmlns:foo="http://www.foo.com">
  <one>
    <!-- children nodes here -->
  </one>
  <two>
    <!-- children nodes here -->
  </two>
  <three xmlns:foo="http://www.foo.com">
    <!-- children nodes here -->
  </three>
</root>

I would like to evaluate an XPath expression (in Java) that would return a NodeList of elements that have this namespace declaration, namely the root and three nodes. I'm not looking for all nodes where this namespace is in scope, only the nodes that have the namespace declaration.

Here's the Java I plan to use:

XPathFactory xPathFactory = XPathFactory.newInstance();
XPath xPath = xPathFactory.newXPath();
XPathExpression xPathExpression = null;  
NodeList nodeList = null;
boolean theExpressionWasCompiled = true;
xPathExpression = xPath.compile(xPathStatement); // XPath goes here!
nodeList = (NodeList) xPathExpression.evaluate(document, XPathConstants.NODESET);

What XPath should I use (the value of xPathStatement for the compile() method)?

Edit: XPath 1 or 2 ok.

Final Edit: So it turns out that XPath can't do exactly what I want (see Dimitre's explanation below if you want details). The best I could do was evaluate an XPath multiple times (once per namespace declaration) to find each element with the namespace declaration. I happened to already know the number of times each namespace is declared, so knowing how many times to evaluate was not a problem for me. Not super efficient, but it does work. Here's the XPath I used, which is very similar to the one Dimitre came up with (see below):

//*[namespace::*[local-name() = 'foo']]
     [not
       (parent::node()
         [namespace::*
           [local-name() = 'foo']
         ]
       )
     ]

Credit to my friend, Roger Costello, for crafting the XPath I used.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would like to evaluate an XPath expression (in Java) that would return a NodeList of elements that have this namespace declaration, namely the root and three nodes. I'm not looking for all nodes where this namespace is in scope, only the nodes that have the namespace declaration.

This information is lost during parsing -- not preserved in the XML Infoset that is created as result of parsing an XML document, and which is used by an XPath processor.

Therefore, it is impossible using XPath to distinguish between the cases when an element has a namespace node (but it is only inherited and not re-declared) and the case when the element has a namespace note and in addition to this it is declared on the element.

The only exception to this is if the element is the first one in its ancestor-or-self::* sequence that has this namespace. In this case, clearly, the namespace node is not inherited, therefore it must be declared on the element:

//*[namespace::*
      [name() = 'foo' and . = 'http://www.foo.com']
  and
    not(parent::*
         [namespace::*
           [name() = 'foo' and . = 'http://www.foo.com']
         ]
        )
    ]

This XPath expression, when evaluated on the provided XML document:

<root xmlns:foo="http://www.foo.com">
    <one>
        <!-- children nodes here -->
    </one>
    <two>
        <!-- children nodes here -->
    </two>
    <three xmlns:foo="http://www.foo.com">
        <!-- children nodes here -->
    </three>
</root>

selects the element named root -- as it should.

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Hah! Well done, Dimitre. I wound up using a very similar expression: //*[namespace::*[local-name() = 'foo']][not(parent::node()[namespace::*[local-name() = 'foo']])]. This doesn't quite do what I want, because I need both elements that declare the namespace (even if XPath is unable to distinguish them). Thus I wound up having to loop over the document multiple times (I know a priori how many declarations there are) and execute this XPath once per declaration. Close enough, I guess. Credit goes to Roger Costello for crafting the XPath I used. –  james.garriss Feb 28 '12 at 16:27
    
@james.garriss: You are welcome. I used a similar XPath expression many years ago when writing the XSLT transformation that is the heart of the XPath Visualizer (huttar.net/dimitre/XPV/TopXML-XPV.html) –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 28 '12 at 16:34
    
I'm surprised that this info is lost in parsing and there's not an easier way to retrieve. Do you know why this info is not preserved? –  james.garriss Feb 28 '12 at 16:40
    
@james.garriss: Probably, because it is of very lexical nature, and the creators of the XML Infopath (and XPath) wanted to keep it small and concise. –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 28 '12 at 16:51

In my understanding what you are looking for is not possible with XPath. The XPath data model has namespace nodes that are in scope for any given element node; in that model whether you parse

<root xmlns:foo="http://example.com/">
  <child>
    <grandchild/>
  </child>
</root>

or

<root xmlns:foo="http://example.com/">
  <child xmlns:foo="http://example.com/">
    <grandchild/>
  </child>
</root>

or

<root xmlns:foo="http://example.com/">
  <child xmlns:foo="http://example.com/">
    <grandchild xmlns:foo="http://example.com/"/>
  </child>
</root>

does not make a difference in the model exposed to XPath (and XSLT or XQuery), in all three cases all three element nodes have a namespace node with local name foo and value http://example.com/ in scope.

Based on that I don't see how you could write an XPath to distinguish between element nodes having a namespace node in scope due to a namespace declaration and those inheriting it from an ancestor element.

So I don't think your problem is solvable with XPath. You might want to wait however until someone like Dimitre confirms or rejects my opinion.

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Thanks for the info, but whether the namesake is in scope or not is not relevant. I'm simply looking to find all elements that have a given namespace declaration. –  james.garriss Feb 28 '12 at 14:01
2  
James, I tried to explain how namespace information is modeled in the XPath data model, in the XPath and XSLT 1.0 data model there are namespace nodes and I explained with an example how namespace declarations in markup result in namespace nodes in the data model, and furthermore how the existing data model in my view lacks the information you are looking for, namely to find out on which element nodes a certain namespace declaration exists. If you say that is not relevant in your view, well, then wait till someone else provides some deeper insight into your problem. –  Martin Honnen Feb 28 '12 at 14:33
    
@MartinHonnen: You are partially (almost 99%) right :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 28 '12 at 16:52

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