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I am trying to develop a system where there are different nodes that are run on different system or on different ports on the same system. Now all the nodes create a Socket with a target IP as the IP of a special node known as a bootstrapping node. The nodes then create their own ServerSocket and start listening for connections. The bootstrapping node maintains a list of Nodes and returns them on being quired. Now what I need is the node must register its IP to the bootstrapping node. I tried using cli.getInetAddress() once the client connects to the ServerSocket of bootstrapping node but that didn't work.

  1. I need the client to register its PPP IP if available;
  2. Otherwise the LAN IP if available;
  3. Otherwise it must register 127.0.0.1 assuming its the same computer.

Please help me with this.

EDIT

using the code:

System.out.println(Inet4Address.getLocalHost().getHostAddress());

or

System.out.println(InetAddress.getLocalHost().getHostAddress());

My PPP Connection IP address is: 117.204.44.192 but the above returns me 192.168.1.2

EDIT2

I am using the following code:

Enumeration e = NetworkInterface.getNetworkInterfaces();
while(e.hasMoreElements())
{
    NetworkInterface n = (NetworkInterface) e.nextElement();
    Enumeration ee = n.getInetAddresses();
    while (ee.hasMoreElements())
    {
        InetAddress i = (InetAddress) ee.nextElement();
        System.out.println(i.getHostAddress());
    }
}

I am able to get all the IP addresses associated all NetworkInterfaces, but how do I distinguish them?? This is the output I am getting:

127.0.0.1
192.168.1.2
192.168.56.1
117.204.44.19
share|improve this question
    
Inet4Address.getLocalHost() should work right ? –  Sears India Feb 28 '12 at 12:29
1  
Inside the loop if I add n.isPointToPoint() will that work?? My idea is to return "127.0.0.1" if no Point to Point network is found. Will that work?? –  sasidhar Feb 28 '12 at 18:48
1  
@sasidhar : Please dont' post your genuine IP address. do write 117.xxx.xxx.xxx, for private IP that's okay. –  nIcE cOw Feb 28 '12 at 19:01
    
@GagandeepBali Thanks for the advice but my IP is a dynamic IP and i get a new IP every time i disconnect and connect my internet. So shouldn't be a problem, I guess. –  sasidhar Feb 29 '12 at 17:59
1  

9 Answers 9

up vote 54 down vote accepted

This could be a bit tricky in the most general case.

On the face of it, InetAddress.getLocalHost() should give you the IP address of this host. The problem is that a host could have lots of network interfaces, and an interface could be bound to more than one IP address. And to top that, not all IP addresses will be reachable from off the machine. Some could be virtual devices, and others could be private network IP addresses.

What this means is that the IP address returned by InetAddress.getLocalHost() might not be the right one to use.

How can you deal with this?

  • One approach is to use NetworkInterface.getNetworkInterfaces() to get all of the known network interfaces on the host, and then iterate over each NI's addresses.
  • Another approach is to (somehow) get the externally advertized FQDN for the host, and use InetAddress.getByName() to look up the primary IP address. (But how do you get it, and how do you deal with a DNS-based load balancer?)
  • A variation of the previous is to get the preferred FQDN from a config file or a command line parameter.
  • Another variation is to to get the IP address from a a config file or a command line parameter.

In summary, InetAddress.getLocalHost() will typically work, but you may need to provide an alternative method for the cases where your code is run in an environment with "complicated" networking.


I am able to get all the IP addresses associated all Network Interfaces, but how do i distinguish them?

  • Any address in the range 127.xxx.xxx.xxx is a "loopback" address. It is only visible to "this" host.
  • Any address in the range 192.168.xxx.xxx is a private (aka site local) IP address. These are reserved for use within an organization. The same applies to 10.xxx.xxx.xxx addresses, and 172.16.xxx.xxx through 172.31.xxx.xxx.
  • Addresses in the range 169.254.xxx.xxx are link local IP addresses. These are reserved for use on a single network segment.
  • Addresses in the range 224.xxx.xxx.xxx through 239.xxx.xxx.xxx are multicast addresses.
  • The address 255.255.255.255 is the broadcast address.
  • Anything else should be a valid public point-to-point IPv4 address.

In fact, the InetAddress API provides methods for testing for loopback, link local, site local, multicast and broadcast addresses. You can use these to sort out which of the IP addresses you get back is most appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
agreed, in my scenario i have more than one NetworkInterface involved. I tried getting the Enumeration of all the NetworkInterfaces and then iterating over them, but that doesn't quite tell me which NetworkInterface is in the current iteration??? –  sasidhar Feb 28 '12 at 15:14
    
In case anyone is curious, getLocalHost essentially does a DNS lookup on the server's hostname. If it gets an IP address from that lookup then it searches through the interfaces available to see which interface has that IP address and it returns that interface. This means getLocalHost will tend to work in a "server" environment where the outgoing IP is the one that maps to the server's hostname. –  Pace Jul 16 at 7:30

You can use java's InetAddress class for this purpose.

InetAddress IP=InetAddress.getLocalHost();
System.out.println("IP of my system is := "+IP.getHostAddress());

Output for my system = IP of my system is := 10.100.98.228

getHostAddress() returns

Returns the IP address string in textual presentation.

OR you can also do

InetAddress IP=InetAddress.getLocalHost();
System.out.println(IP.toString());

Output = IP of my system is := RanRag-PC/10.100.98.228

share|improve this answer
2  
Note that 10.x.x.x is a private address, indicating that your system is on a NAT network. It will appear as a different address when contacting the outside world. If you truly need the external IP address, you'll have to contact one of many sites which will echo back to you the IP address you're coming from. This may or may not be useful to you. Your system will almost surely not be reachable from the outside in any event. –  Edward Falk Apr 19 '13 at 0:04

Posting here tested IP ambiguity workaround code from https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/JCS-40 (InetAddress.getLocalHost() ambiguous on Linux systems):

/**
 * Returns an <code>InetAddress</code> object encapsulating what is most likely the machine's LAN IP address.
 * <p/>
 * This method is intended for use as a replacement of JDK method <code>InetAddress.getLocalHost</code>, because
 * that method is ambiguous on Linux systems. Linux systems enumerate the loopback network interface the same
 * way as regular LAN network interfaces, but the JDK <code>InetAddress.getLocalHost</code> method does not
 * specify the algorithm used to select the address returned under such circumstances, and will often return the
 * loopback address, which is not valid for network communication. Details
 * <a href="http://bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=4665037">here</a>.
 * <p/>
 * This method will scan all IP addresses on all network interfaces on the host machine to determine the IP address
 * most likely to be the machine's LAN address. If the machine has multiple IP addresses, this method will prefer
 * a site-local IP address (e.g. 192.168.x.x or 10.10.x.x, usually IPv4) if the machine has one (and will return the
 * first site-local address if the machine has more than one), but if the machine does not hold a site-local
 * address, this method will return simply the first non-loopback address found (IPv4 or IPv6).
 * <p/>
 * If this method cannot find a non-loopback address using this selection algorithm, it will fall back to
 * calling and returning the result of JDK method <code>InetAddress.getLocalHost</code>.
 * <p/>
 *
 * @throws UnknownHostException If the LAN address of the machine cannot be found.
 */
private static InetAddress getLocalHostLANAddress() throws UnknownHostException {
    try {
        InetAddress candidateAddress = null;
        // Iterate all NICs (network interface cards)...
        for (Enumeration ifaces = NetworkInterface.getNetworkInterfaces(); ifaces.hasMoreElements();) {
            NetworkInterface iface = (NetworkInterface) ifaces.nextElement();
            // Iterate all IP addresses assigned to each card...
            for (Enumeration inetAddrs = iface.getInetAddresses(); inetAddrs.hasMoreElements();) {
                InetAddress inetAddr = (InetAddress) inetAddrs.nextElement();
                if (!inetAddr.isLoopbackAddress()) {

                    if (inetAddr.isSiteLocalAddress()) {
                        // Found non-loopback site-local address. Return it immediately...
                        return inetAddr;
                    }
                    else if (candidateAddress == null) {
                        // Found non-loopback address, but not necessarily site-local.
                        // Store it as a candidate to be returned if site-local address is not subsequently found...
                        candidateAddress = inetAddr;
                        // Note that we don't repeatedly assign non-loopback non-site-local addresses as candidates,
                        // only the first. For subsequent iterations, candidate will be non-null.
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        if (candidateAddress != null) {
            // We did not find a site-local address, but we found some other non-loopback address.
            // Server might have a non-site-local address assigned to its NIC (or it might be running
            // IPv6 which deprecates the "site-local" concept).
            // Return this non-loopback candidate address...
            return candidateAddress;
        }
        // At this point, we did not find a non-loopback address.
        // Fall back to returning whatever InetAddress.getLocalHost() returns...
        InetAddress jdkSuppliedAddress = InetAddress.getLocalHost();
        if (jdkSuppliedAddress == null) {
            throw new UnknownHostException("The JDK InetAddress.getLocalHost() method unexpectedly returned null.");
        }
        return jdkSuppliedAddress;
    }
    catch (Exception e) {
        UnknownHostException unknownHostException = new UnknownHostException("Failed to determine LAN address: " + e);
        unknownHostException.initCause(e);
        throw unknownHostException;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
It must be noted that this still doesn't resolve ambuguity in case host has multiple similar nerwork interfaces. –  Vadzim Dec 7 '13 at 8:53

You can use java.net.InetAddress API. Try this :

InetAddress.getLocalHost().getHostAddress;
share|improve this answer

Use InetAddress.getLocalHost() to get the local address

import java.net.InetAddress;

try {
  InetAddress addr = InetAddress.getLocalHost();            
  System.out.println(addr.getHostAddress());
} catch (UnknownHostException e) {
}
share|improve this answer
    
My PPP Connection Ip address is: 117.204.44.192 But the above returns me 192.168.1.2 –  sasidhar Feb 28 '12 at 12:54

EDIT 1: Updated code, since the previous link, exists no more

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;

public class GetMyIP {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        URL url = null;
        BufferedReader in = null;
        String ipAddress = "";
        try {
            url = new URL("http://bot.whatismyipaddress.com");
            in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(url.openStream()));
            ipAddress = in.readLine().trim();
            /* IF not connected to internet, then
             * the above code will return one empty
             * String, we can check it's length and
             * if length is not greater than zero, 
             * then we can go for LAN IP or Local IP
             * or PRIVATE IP
             */
            if (!(ipAddress.length() > 0)) {
                try {
                    InetAddress ip = InetAddress.getLocalHost();
                    System.out.println((ip.getHostAddress()).trim());
                    ipAddress = (ip.getHostAddress()).trim();
                } catch(Exception exp) {
                    ipAddress = "ERROR";
                }
            }
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            // This try will give the Private IP of the Host.
            try {
                InetAddress ip = InetAddress.getLocalHost();
                System.out.println((ip.getHostAddress()).trim());
                ipAddress = (ip.getHostAddress()).trim();
            } catch(Exception exp) {
                ipAddress = "ERROR";
            }
            //ex.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("IP Address: " + ipAddress);
    }
}

ACTUAL VERSION: This stopped working

Hopefully this snippet might help you to achieve this :

// Method to get the IP Address of the Host.
private String getIP()
{
    // This try will give the Public IP Address of the Host.
    try
    {
        URL url = new URL("http://automation.whatismyip.com/n09230945.asp");
        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(url.openStream()));
        String ipAddress = new String();
        ipAddress = (in.readLine()).trim();
        /* IF not connected to internet, then
         * the above code will return one empty
         * String, we can check it's length and
         * if length is not greater than zero, 
         * then we can go for LAN IP or Local IP
         * or PRIVATE IP
         */
        if (!(ipAddress.length() > 0))
        {
            try
            {
                InetAddress ip = InetAddress.getLocalHost();
                System.out.println((ip.getHostAddress()).trim());
                return ((ip.getHostAddress()).trim());
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                return "ERROR";
            }
        }
        System.out.println("IP Address is : " + ipAddress);

        return (ipAddress);
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        // This try will give the Private IP of the Host.
        try
        {
            InetAddress ip = InetAddress.getLocalHost();
            System.out.println((ip.getHostAddress()).trim());
            return ((ip.getHostAddress()).trim());
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            return "ERROR";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The solution would work, hopefully if i am always connected to the internet, but i am not guaranteed that. Besides, when the system is not connected to the internet and then I need to return the LAN IP address of the system if any, otherwise the localhost. So not a feasible option for me. Any other way?? –  sasidhar Feb 28 '12 at 17:34
    
@sasidhar : When you are connected to the Internet, only then you be having your public IP I guess, if you are not connected then this method will give you, your local IP or LAN IP, and for the last condition as specified by you you can return "127.0.0.1", instead of returning Error. –  nIcE cOw Feb 28 '12 at 17:40
    
Theoretically looks fine but i have the following IPs on my system 127.0.0.1 -> localhost 192.168.1.2 -> The IP assigned by my modem (Ethernet Adapter Local Area Connection) 192.168.56.1 -> Virtual-box (Ethernet Adapter Virtual-box Host-only Network) 117.204.44.19 -> My actual IP connected to the internet (PPP adapter dataone) I am basically not connected to any LAN. But if i disconnect my internet. It returns me 192.168.1.2 instead of 127.0.0.1 So it is typically important to explore the NetworkInterface I guess –  sasidhar Feb 28 '12 at 18:29
1  
I like your approach but that link seems not to work anymore!! Can I put a controller on my own system to work instead of that external link and so be more reliable??? –  Bludream Aug 27 at 12:23
1  
@Bludream: Thankyou so much, for bringing this to my knowledge, that the link is not working anymore. I have updated the post, with some new inputs. Hopefully it works for your usercase. Regarding your question, I really don't know, how to setup a controller on your own system to make it work. So I won't be able to give insight on this topic, MY BAD. Thanks again and KEEP SMILING :-) –  nIcE cOw Aug 27 at 15:48
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.NetworkInterface;
import java.util.Enumeration;

public class IpAddress {

NetworkInterface ifcfg;
Enumeration<InetAddress> addresses;
String address;

public String getIpAddress(String host) {
    try {
        ifcfg = NetworkInterface.getByName(host);
        addresses = ifcfg.getInetAddresses();
        while (addresses.hasMoreElements()) {
            address = addresses.nextElement().toString();
            address = address.replace("/", "");
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return ifcfg.toString();
}
}
share|improve this answer

firstly import the class

import java.net.InetAddress;

in class

  InetAddress iAddress = InetAddress.getLocalHost();
  String currentIp = iAddress.getHostAddress();
  System.out.println("Current IP address : " +currentIp); //gives only host address
share|improve this answer

Example in scala (useful in sbt file):

import collection.JavaConversions._
import java.net._
def getIpAddress:String = {
        val enumeration: Iterator[NetworkInterface] = NetworkInterface.getNetworkInterfaces
        val ipAddresses = enumeration.flatMap(p =>
          p.getInetAddresses.toSeq
        )
        val inetAddressOption = ipAddresses.find( address =>{
          val host = address.getHostAddress
          host.contains(".") && !address.isLoopbackAddress
          }
        ) 
        val inetAddress = inetAddressOption.getOrElse(InetAddress.getLocalHost)
        inetAddress.getHostAddress
}
share|improve this answer

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