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I have a simple windows service that I created using python. My issue is that I do not know how long the service is going to take to complete, it could have 15 seconds, or it could take 4+ hours depending on what needs to be done with the data. The 4+ hours is a rare case, but I have had situation where this happens.

Below is the general pattern that I've been following for windows services. I took out all the logic, but that's not the issue, and only left a dummy logging command. Is there a way to prevent the service to continuing or not refreshing until the logic portion is completed instead of using the timeout?

import win32service
import win32serviceutil
import win32api
import win32con
import win32event
import win32evtlogutil
import os
import sys
import time
import logging
class aservice(win32serviceutil.ServiceFramework):
    _svc_name_ = "WeatherService"
    _svc_display_name_ = "Weather Service"
    _svc_description_ = "Downloads weather data from NOAA and creates maps"
    def __init__(self, args):
        win32serviceutil.ServiceFramework.__init__(self, args)
        self.hWaitStop = win32event.CreateEvent(None, 0, 0, None)           
    def SvcStop(self):
        self.ReportServiceStatus(win32service.SERVICE_STOP_PENDING)
        win32event.SetEvent(self.hWaitStop)                      
    def SvcDoRun(self):
        import servicemanager      
        servicemanager.LogMsg(servicemanager.EVENTLOG_INFORMATION_TYPE,
                              servicemanager.PYS_SERVICE_STARTED,(self._svc_name_, '')) 
        self.timeout = 640000    #640 seconds / 10 minutes (value is in milliseconds)
        #self.timeout = 120000     #120 seconds / 2 minutes
        # This is how long the service will wait to run / refresh itself (see script below)
        while 1:
            # Wait for service stop signal, if I timeout, loop again
            rc = win32event.WaitForSingleObject(self.hWaitStop, self.timeout)
            # Check to see if self.hWaitStop happened
            if rc == win32event.WAIT_OBJECT_0:
                # Stop signal encountered
                servicemanager.LogInfoMsg(self._svc_name_ + " - STOPPED!")  #For Event Log
                break
            else:
                #[actual service code between rests]
                try:
                    logging.basicConfig(filename=r"c:\temp\example.log",level=logging.DEBUG,
                                        format='%(asctime)s %(message)s')
                    logging.debug('This message should go to the log file')
                    logging.info('So should this')
                    logging.warning('And this, too')

                    #file_path = "C:\whereever\my_REAL_py_work_to_be_done.py"
                    #execfile(file_path)             #Execute the script
                    #inc_file_path2 = "C:\whereever\MORE_REAL_py_work_to_be_done.py"
                    #execfile(inc_file_path2)        #Execute the script
                except:
                    pass
                #[actual service code between rests]


def ctrlHandler(ctrlType):
    return True

if __name__ == '__main__':   
    win32api.SetConsoleCtrlHandler(ctrlHandler, True)   
    win32serviceutil.HandleCommandLine(aservice)
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3 Answers 3

You can start a new process to do the long-running things. If a stop signal arrives, you kill the child process.

share|improve this answer
    
When I set the timeout to infinite, it never moves past the rs = win32event.WaitForSingleObject(). So how should I create the stop signal/loop to allow for infinite time to be taken? –  josh1234 Feb 28 '12 at 19:30

Use the service as a controller with multiple threads. One thread (Main) is supposed to synchronize and queue commands and use the win32 serviceframework for communication, registerting to the system etc. Another thread (Worker) is supposed to wait on commands from queue and execute them. If you execute arbitrary code as separate processes then you can spawn those from the worker thread and simply read back the results once they are done and clean up.

This way, when a stop arrives your main thread will register it to the worker in its queue, which will wake up and try to signal the other process(es) to quit, wait a bit and clean up or terminate them forcefully.

Update:

Below is a sample concept on how you could have a service that is always responsive and runs as long as necessary. Each worker may throw

...
import threading
...

class InterruptedException(Exception):
    pass

class WorkerThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, controller):
        self._controller = controller
        self._stop = threading.Event()
        super(WorkerThread, self).__init__()

    def stop(self):
        self._stop.set()

    def stopped(self):
        return self._stop.isSet()

    def run(self):
        try:
           # Insert the code you want to run as a service here
           # rather than do "execfile(.../.../blah)" simply do:
           # You can have your code throw InterruptedException if your code needs to exit
           # Also check often if self.stopped and then cleanly exit

           import your_file
           your_file.main()

           # if code in another module is not yours or cannot check often if it should stop then use multiprocessing which will spawn separate processes that you can terminate then from here when you need to stop and return
           # in that case simply block here on self._stop.wait()

        except InterruptedException as exc:
           # We are forcefully quitting 
           pass
        except Exception as e:
           # Oh oh, did not anticipate this, better report to Windows or log it
        finally:
           # Close/release any connections, handles, files etc.

           # OK, we can stop now
           win32event.SetEvent(self._controller)

def __init__(self, args):
    win32serviceutil.ServiceFramework.__init__(self, args)
    self.hWaitStop = win32event.CreateEvent(None, 0, 0, None)      
    self.hWaitDone = win32event.CreateEvent(None, 0, 0, None)

def SvcDoRun(self):
    import servicemanager      
    servicemanager.LogMsg(servicemanager.EVENTLOG_INFORMATION_TYPE,
                          servicemanager.PYS_SERVICE_STARTED,(self._svc_name_, '')) 

    worker = WorkerThread(self.hWaitDone)
    worker.start()

    while True:
        # Wait for service stop signal
        rc = win32event.WaitForMultipleObjects([self.hWaitStop, self.hWaitDone], win32event.INFINITE)

        # Check to see if self.hWaitStop happened as part of Windows Service Management
        if rc == 0:
            # Stop signal encountered
            servicemanager.LogInfoMsg(self._svc_name_ + " - STOPPED!")  #For Event Log
            break

        if rc == 1:
            # Wait until worker has fully finished
            worker.join()

            # Determine from worker state if we need to start again (because run finished)
            # Or do whatever
            if not worker.need_to_start_again():
                break

            worker.start()
share|improve this answer
    
I understand that concept of stopping the thread, etc, but if I use this: rc = win32event.WaitForSingleObject(self.hWaitStop, self.timeout) where self.timeout is some value in seconds, I find that the service sometimes will timeout, but I don't want it to. I don't know the total processing time. If I change from self.timeout to win32event.INFINITE it doesn't work either –  josh1234 Feb 28 '12 at 15:59
    
See update above on how you could restructure to eliminate needs to rely on timeouts. –  astevanovic Feb 29 '12 at 1:32
    
It appears that the service never goes beyond here: # Wait for service stop signal rc = win32event.WaitForMultipleObjects([self.hWaitStop, self.hWaitDone], win32event.INFINITE). When I watch the service, even doing the most basic things like just writing to a file, it crashes. –  josh1234 Feb 29 '12 at 11:58

I ended up using this pattern: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/551780/

It works well, but not like a charm. I do have issues with multiprocessing the process is not spawning the instances. Suggestions on That?

Please continue to post your answers, I would like to see everyone's solutions because the win32api can be hard to work with.

Thank you Everyone

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