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I've created a question about this a few days. My solution is something in the lines of what was suggested in the accepted answer. However, a friend of mine came up with the following solution:

Please note that the code has been updated a few times (check the edit revisions) to reflect the suggestions in the answers below. If you intend to give a new answer, please do so with this new code in mind and not the old one which had lots of problems.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    int fd[2], i, aux, std0, std1;

    do {
    	std0 = dup(0); // backup stdin
    	std1 = dup(1); // backup stdout

    	// let's pretend I'm reading commands here in a shell prompt
    	READ_COMMAND_FROM_PROMPT();

    	for(i=1; i<argc; i++) {
    		// do we have a previous command?
    		if(i > 1) {
    			dup2(aux, 0);
    			close(aux);
    		}

    		// do we have a next command?
    		if(i < argc-1) {
    			pipe(fd);

    			aux = fd[0];
    			dup2(fd[1], 1);
    			close(fd[1]);
    		}

    		// last command? restore stdout...
    		if(i == argc-1) {
    			dup2(std1, 1);
    			close(std1);
    		}

    		if(!fork()) {
    			// if not last command, close all pipe ends
    			// (the child doesn't use them)
    			if(i < argc-1) {
    				close(std0);
    				close(std1);
    				close(fd[0]);
    			}

    			execlp(argv[i], argv[i], NULL);
    			exit(0);
    		}
    	}

    	// restore stdin to be able to keep using the shell
    	dup2(std0, 0);
    	close(std0);
    }

    return 0;
}

This simulates a series of commands through pipes like in bash, for instance: cmd1 | cmd2 | ... | cmd_n. I say "simulate", because, as you can see, the commands are actually read from the arguments. Just to spare time coding a simple shell prompt...

Of course there are some issues to fix and to add like error handling but that's not the point here. I think I kinda get the code but it still makes me a lot of confusing how this whole thing works.

Am I missing something or this really works and it's a nice and clean solution to solve the problem? If not, can anyone point me the crucial problems this code has?

share|improve this question
    
what is this code supposed to be doing? –  lothar Jun 4 '09 at 1:54
    
Sorry about that, I've edited the post to reflect a simple description on the code. –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 1:58
1  
I'm starting to think that you need to take a step back and separate this into its component parts, in cleanly split functions, instead of build it all into a single growing hack. The logic will become much clearer once you can identify some suitable abstractions and invariants. Once again, I believe that my patch-tag.com/r/xsh simple shell example is a good model to follow. –  ephemient Jun 4 '09 at 4:58
    
Like I said before, your shell is way more than what I need. I'm already confused as it is... –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 14:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looks reasonable, though it really needs to fix leaking std and aux to the children and after the loop, and the parent's original stdin is lost forever.

This would probably be better with color...

./a.out foo bar baz <stdin >stdout
std = dup(stdout)     ||     |+==========================std
                      ||     ||                          ||
pipe(fd)              ||     ||    pipe1[0] -- pipe0[1]  ||
                      ||     ||       ||          ||     ||
aux = fd[0]           ||     ||      aux          ||     ||
                      ||     XX       ||          ||     ||
                      ||      /-------++----------+|     ||
dup2(fd[1], 1)        ||     //       ||          ||     ||
                      ||     ||       ||          ||     ||
close(fd[1])          ||     ||       ||          XX     ||
                      ||     ||       ||                 ||
fork+exec(foo)        ||     ||       ||                 ||
                      XX     ||       ||                 ||
                       /-----++-------+|                 ||
dup2(aux, 0)          //     ||       ||                 ||
                      ||     ||       ||                 ||
close(aux)            ||     ||       XX                 ||
                      ||     ||                          ||
pipe(fd)              ||     ||    pipe2[0] -- pipe2[1]  ||
                      ||     ||       ||          ||     ||
aux = fd[0]           ||     ||      aux          ||     ||
                      ||     XX       ||          ||     ||
                      ||      /-------++----------+|     ||
dup2(fd[1], 1)        ||     //       ||          ||     ||
                      ||     ||       ||          ||     ||
close(fd[1])          ||     ||       ||          XX     ||
                      ||     ||       ||                 ||
fork+exec(bar)        ||     ||       ||                 ||
                      XX     ||       ||                 ||
                       /-----++-------+|                 ||
dup2(aux, 0)          //     ||       ||                 ||
                      ||     ||       ||                 ||
close(aux)            ||     ||       XX                 ||
                      ||     ||                          ||
pipe(fd)              ||     ||    pipe3[0] -- pipe3[1]  ||
                      ||     ||       ||          ||     ||
aux = fd[0]           ||     ||      aux          ||     ||
                      ||     XX       ||          ||     ||
                      ||      /-------++----------+|     ||
dup2(fd[1], 1)        ||     //       ||          ||     ||
                      ||     ||       ||          ||     ||
close(fd[1])          ||     ||       ||          XX     ||
                      ||     XX       ||                 ||
                      ||      /-------++-----------------+|
dup2(std, 1)          ||     //       ||                 ||
                      ||     ||       ||                 ||
fork+exec(baz)        ||     ||       ||                 ||
  • foo gets stdin=stdin, stdout=pipe1[1]
  • bar gets stdin=pipe1[0], stdout=pipe2[1]
  • baz gets stdin=pipe2[0], stdout=stdout


My suggestion is different in that it avoids mangling the parent's stdin and stdout, only manipulating them within the child, and never leaks any FDs. It's a bit harder to diagram, though.

for cmd in cmds
    if there is a next cmd
        pipe(new_fds)
    fork
    if child
        if there is a previous cmd
            dup2(old_fds[0], 0)
            close(old_fds[0])
            close(old_fds[1])
        if there is a next cmd
            close(new_fds[0])
            dup2(new_fds[1], 1)
            close(new_fds[1])
        exec cmd || die
    else
        if there is a previous cmd
            close(old_fds[0])
            close(old_fds[1])
        if there is a next cmd
            old_fds = new_fds
parent
    cmds = [foo, bar, baz]
    fds = {0: stdin, 1: stdout}

cmd = cmds[0] {
    there is a next cmd {
        pipe(new_fds)
            new_fds = {3, 4}
            fds = {0: stdin, 1: stdout, 3: pipe1[0], 4: pipe1[1]}
    }

    fork             => child
                        there is a next cmd {
                            close(new_fds[0])
                                fds = {0: stdin, 1: stdout, 4: pipe1[1]}
                            dup2(new_fds[1], 1)
                                fds = {0: stdin, 1: pipe1[1], 4: pipe1[1]}
                            close(new_fds[1])
                                fds = {0: stdin, 1: pipe1[1]}
                        }
                        exec(cmd)

    there is a next cmd {
        old_fds = new_fds
            old_fds = {3, 4}
    }
}

cmd = cmds[1] {
    there is a next cmd {
        pipe(new_fds)
            new_fds = {5, 6}
            fds = {0: stdin, 1: stdout, 3: pipe1[0], 4: pipe1[1],
                                        5: pipe2[0], 6: pipe2[1]}
    }

    fork             => child
                        there is a previous cmd {
                            dup2(old_fds[0], 0)
                                fds = {0: pipe1[0], 1: stdout,
                                       3: pipe1[0], 4: pipe1[1],
                                       5: pipe2[0], 6: pipe2[1]}
                            close(old_fds[0])
                                fds = {0: pipe1[0], 1: stdout,
                                                    4: pipe1[1],
                                       5: pipe2[0]  6: pipe2[1]}
                            close(old_fds[1])
                                fds = {0: pipe1[0], 1: stdout,
                                       5: pipe2[0], 6: pipe2[1]}
                        }
                        there is a next cmd {
                            close(new_fds[0])
                                fds = {0: pipe1[0], 1: stdout, 6: pipe2[1]}
                            dup2(new_fds[1], 1)
                                fds = {0: pipe1[0], 1: pipe2[1], 6: pipe2[1]}
                            close(new_fds[1])
                                fds = {0: pipe1[0], 1: pipe1[1]}
                        }
                        exec(cmd)

    there is a previous cmd {
        close(old_fds[0])
            fds = {0: stdin, 1: stdout,              4: pipe1[1],
                                        5: pipe2[0], 6: pipe2[1]}
        close(old_fds[1])
            fds = {0: stdin, 1: stdout, 5: pipe2[0], 6: pipe2[1]}
    }

    there is a next cmd {
        old_fds = new_fds
            old_fds = {3, 4}
    }
}

cmd = cmds[2] {
    fork             => child
                        there is a previous cmd {
                            dup2(old_fds[0], 0)
                                fds = {0: pipe2[0], 1: stdout,
                                       5: pipe2[0], 6: pipe2[1]}
                            close(old_fds[0])
                                fds = {0: pipe2[0], 1: stdout,
                                                    6: pipe2[1]}
                            close(old_fds[1])
                                fds = {0: pipe2[0], 1: stdout}
                        }
                        exec(cmd)

    there is a previous cmd {
        close(old_fds[0])
            fds = {0: stdin, 1: stdout,              6: pipe2[1]}
        close(old_fds[1])
            fds = {0: stdin, 1: stdout}
    }
}


Edit

Your updated code does fix the previous FD leaks… but adds one: you're now leaking std0 to the children. As Jon says, this is probably not dangerous to most programs... but you still should write a better behaved shell than this.

Even if it's temporary, I would strongly recommend against mangling your own shell's standard in/out/err (0/1/2), only doing so within the child right before exec. Why? Suppose you add some printf debugging in the middle, or you need to bail out due to an error condition. You'll be in trouble if you don't clean up your messed-up standard file descriptors first. Please, for the sake of having things operate as expected even in unexpected scenarios, don't muck with them until you need to.


Edit

As I mentioned in other comments, splitting it up into smaller parts makes it much easier to understand. This small helper should be easily understandable and bug-free:

/* cmd, argv: passed to exec
 * fd_in, fd_out: when not -1, replaces stdin and stdout
 * return: pid of fork+exec child
 */
int fork_and_exec_with_fds(char *cmd, char **argv, int fd_in, int fd_out) {
    pid_t child = fork();
    if (fork)
        return child;

    if (fd_in != -1 && fd_in != 0) {
        dup2(fd_in, 0);
        close(fd_in);
    }

    if (fd_out != -1 && fd_in != 1) {
        dup2(fd_out, 1);
        close(fd_out);
    }

    execvp(cmd, argv);
    exit(-1);
}

As should this:

void run_pipeline(int num, char *cmds[], char **argvs[], int pids[]) {
    /* initially, don't change stdin */
    int fd_in = -1, fd_out;
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < num; i++) {
        int fd_pipe[2];

        /* if there is a next command, set up a pipe for stdout */
        if (i + 1 < num) {
            pipe(fd_pipe);
            fd_out = fd_pipe[1];
        }
        /* otherwise, don't change stdout */
        else
            fd_out = -1;

        /* run child with given stdin/stdout */
        pids[i] = fork_and_exec_with_fds(cmds[i], argvs[i], fd_in, fd_out);

        /* nobody else needs to use these fds anymore
         * safe because close(-1) does nothing */
        close(fd_in);
        close(fd_out);

        /* set up stdin for next command */
        fd_in = fd_pipe[0];
    }
}

You can see Bash's execute_cmd.c#execute_disk_command being called from execute_cmd.c#execute_pipeline, xsh's process.c#process_run being called from jobs.c#job_run, and even every single one of BusyBox's various small and minimal shells splits them up.

share|improve this answer
    
That's quite a diagram! –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 4 '09 at 2:55
    
Indeed... Although, I still think it's confusing lol but I think I get it how it all works now. And yes we are aware that it's missing some closes(), maybe not as much as the ones you guys are pointing out. We also know about the lost stdin, I found that the hard way with segmentation fault when returning to the shell. I gotta be honest though ephemient, I couldn't understand your solution. I tried and tried to get my head around it but can't understand, so I tried it my own way using a few tips from your code. I'll post my full code in a new answer below... –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 3:30
    
I've updated the code in the first answer a few times now and I think I got it in this last one. Could you please take a look and see if I'm missing anything important? –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 4:08
    
I understand now what you are saying about not doing those changes in the parent. Like I said, this was my friends approach and although I didn't knew why, I wasn't very comfortable with it. I forgot to post my own code, going to do it in a few seconds in an answer below... –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 14:29
    
I was looking (again) at the "diagram" for you own solution and I'm not sure, but I think you have an error. On the second command iteration, in the parent, you check for a next command, if there is one, set the old_fds = new_fds. Shouldn't the old_fds be equal to {5, 6} instead of {3, 4} as you have there? –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 15:23

The key problem is that you create a bunch of pipes and don't make sure that all the ends are closed properly. If you create a pipe, you get two file descriptors; if you fork, then you have four file descriptors. If you dup() or dup2() one end of the pipe to a standard descriptor, you need to close both ends of the pipe - at least one of the closes must be after the dup() or dup2() operation.


Consider the file descriptors available to the first command (assuming there are at least two - something that should be handled in general (no pipe() or I/O redirection needed with just one command), but I recognize that the error handling is eliminated to keep the code suitable for SO):

    std=dup(1);    // Likely: std = 3
    pipe(fd);      // Likely: fd[0] = 4, fd[1] = 5
    aux = fd[0];
    dup2(fd[1], 1);
    close(fd[1]);  // Closes 5

    if (fork() == 0) {
         // Need to close: fd[0] aka aux = 4
         // Need to close: std = 3
         close(fd[0]);
         close(std);
         execlp(argv[i], argv[i], NULL);
         exit(1);
    }

Note that because fd[0] is not closed in the child, the child will never get EOF on its standard input; this is usually problematic. The non-closure of std is less critical.


Revisiting amended code (as of 2009-06-03T20:52-07:00)...

Assume that process starts with file descriptors 0, 1, 2 (standard input, output, error) open only. Also assume we have exactly 3 commands to process. As before, this code writes out the loop with annotations.

std0 = dup(0); // backup stdin - 3
std1 = dup(1); // backup stdout - 4

// Iteration 1 (i == 1)
// We have another command
pipe(fd);   // fd[0] = 5; fd[1] = 6
aux = fd[0]; // aux = 5
dup2(fd[1], 1);
close(fd[1]);       // 6 closed
// Not last command
if (fork() == 0) {
    // Not last command
    close(std1);    // 4 closed
    close(fd[0]);   // 5 closed
    // Minor problemette: 3 still open
    execlp(argv[i], argv[i], NULL);
    }
// Parent has open 3, 4, 5 - no problem

// Iteration 2 (i == 2)
// There was a previous command
dup2(aux, 0);      // stdin now on read end of pipe
close(aux);        // 5 closed
// We have another command
pipe(fd);          // fd[0] = 5; fd[1] = 6
aux = fd[0];
dup2(fd[1], 1);
close(fd[1]);      // 6 closed
// Not last command
if (fork() == 0) {
    // Not last command
    close(std1);   // 4 closed
    close(fd[0]);  // 5 closed
    // As before, 3 is still open - not a major problem
    execlp(argv[i], argv[i], NULL);
    }
// Parent has open 3, 4, 5 - no problem

// Iteration 3 (i == 3)
// We have a previous command
dup2(aux, 0);      // stdin is now read end of pipe 
close(aux);        // 5 closed
// No more commands

// Last command - restore stdout...
dup2(std1, 1);     // stdin is back where it started
close(std1);       // 4 closed

if (fork() == 0) {
    // Last command
    // 3 still open
    execlp(argv[i], argv[i], NULL);
}
// Parent has closed 4 when it should not have done so!!!
// End of loop
// restore stdin to be able to keep using the shell
dup2(std0, 0);
// 3 still open - as desired

So, all the children have the original standard input connected as file descriptor 3. This is not ideal, though it is not dreadfully traumatic; I'm hard pressed to find a circumstance where this would matter.

Closing file descriptor 4 in the parent is a mistake - the next iteration of 'read a command and process it won't work because std1 is not initialized inside the loop.

Generally, this is close to correct - but not quite correct.

share|improve this answer
    
Like I said, we were aware of some missing closes, but not those on the child though... One thing though, closing fd[0] is the same as closing aux in the child? –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 3:31
    
With all your suggestions, I tried to fix the "pseudo" code in the first post, can you please take a look at the new code and see if I missed something? –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 3:42
    
Just in case you were looking at the edited code I posted a few minutes ago, I've updated it again, I think it's better now. –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 3:50
1  
Because aux is a copy of fd[0], it doesn't matter which of the two you pass to close() -- the same file descriptor will be closed. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 4 '09 at 3:50
1  
@Nazgulled: I've looked at the latest code - I think it is OK (though the 'do' loop doesn't have a 'while' at the end - it is pseudo-code still). I have not done a formal paper-execution of the code as I did previously. You should do so to satisfy yourself that it is correct. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 4 '09 at 22:42

It will give results, some that are not expected. It is far from a nice solution: It messes with the parent process' standard descriptors, does not recover the standard input, descriptors leak to children, etc.

If you think recursively, it may be easier to understand. Below is a correct solution, without error checking. Consider a linked-list type command, with it's next pointer and a argv array.

void run_pipeline(command *cmd, int input) {
  int pfds[2] = { -1, -1 };

  if (cmd->next != NULL) {
    pipe(pfds);
  }
  if (fork() == 0) { /* child */
    if (input != -1) {
      dup2(input, STDIN_FILENO);
      close(input);
    }
    if (pfds[1] != -1) {
      dup2(pfds[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
      close(pfds[1]);
    }
    if (pfds[0] != -1) {
      close(pfds[0]);
    }
    execvp(cmd->argv[0], cmd->argv);
    exit(1);
  }
  else { /* parent */
    if (input != -1) {
      close(input);
    }
    if (pfds[1] != -1) {
      close(pfds[1]);
    }
    if (cmd->next != NULL) {
      run_pipeline(cmd->next, pfds[0]);
    }
  }
}

Call it with the first command in the linked-list, and input = -1. It does the rest.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I think this is even more confusing than the code above which I already understand. Thanks for your input though. –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 3:59
    
One thing though, is that so bad messing with the parents descriptors if I restore them like I'm doing in the updated code? Please look at the new code if you haven't done so. –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 4 '09 at 4:08
1  
You should look at my code again, it is not that much complicated. ; Yes, it is still bad. The whole point of fork+exec is that you can "prepare the house" (descriptors, permissions, capabilities, environment variables, etc) between the fork and the exec calls. Doing everything in the parent overcomplicates something intended to be simple. –  Juliano Jun 4 '09 at 4:26
    
I'm not convinced that explaining it recursively is any better than explaining it iteratively, but... +1 for hammering in those points, or at least trying to. –  ephemient Jun 4 '09 at 4:51

Both in this question and in another (as linked in the first post), ephemient suggested me a solution to the problem without messing with the parents file descriptors as demonstrated by a possible solution in this question.

I didn't get his solution, I tried and tried to understand but I can't seem to get it. I also tried to code it without understanding but it didn't work. Probably because I've failed to understand it correctly and wasn't able to code it the it should have been coded.

Anyway, I tried to come up with my own solution using some of the things I understood from the pseudo code and came up with this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <wait.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <readline/readline.h>
#include <readline/history.h>

#define NUMPIPES 5
#define NUMARGS 10

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char *bBuffer, *sPtr, *aPtr = NULL, *pipeComms[NUMPIPES], *cmdArgs[NUMARGS];
    int aPipe[2], bPipe[2], pCount, aCount, i, status;
    pid_t pid;

    using_history();

    while(1) {
    	bBuffer = readline("\e[1;31mShell \e[1;32m# \e[0m");

    	if(!strcasecmp(bBuffer, "exit")) {
    		return 0;
    	}

    	if(strlen(bBuffer) > 0) {
    		add_history(bBuffer);
    	}

    	sPtr = bBuffer;
    	pCount =0;

    	do {
    		aPtr = strsep(&sPtr, "|");

    		if(aPtr != NULL) {
    			if(strlen(aPtr) > 0) {
    				pipeComms[pCount++] = aPtr;
    			}
    		}
    	} while(aPtr);

    	cmdArgs[pCount] = NULL;

    	for(i = 0; i < pCount; i++) {
    		aCount = 0;

    		do {
    			aPtr = strsep(&pipeComms[i], " ");

    			if(aPtr != NULL) {
    				if(strlen(aPtr) > 0) {
    					cmdArgs[aCount++] = aPtr;
    				}
    			}
    		} while(aPtr);

    		cmdArgs[aCount] = NULL;

    		// Do we have a next command?
    		if(i < pCount-1) {
    			// Is this the first, third, fifth, etc... command?
    			if(i%2 == 0) {
    				pipe(aPipe);
    			}

    			// Is this the second, fourth, sixth, etc... command?
    			if(i%2 == 1) {
    				pipe(bPipe);
    			}
    		}

    		pid = fork();

    		if(pid == 0) {
    			// Is this the first, third, fifth, etc... command?
    			if(i%2 == 0) {
    				// Do we have a previous command?
    				if(i > 0) {
    					close(bPipe[1]);
    					dup2(bPipe[0], STDIN_FILENO);
    					close(bPipe[0]);
    				}

    				// Do we have a next command?
    				if(i < pCount-1) {
    					close(aPipe[0]);
    					dup2(aPipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
    					close(aPipe[1]);
    				}
    			}

    			// Is this the second, fourth, sixth, etc... command?
    			if(i%2 == 1) {
    				// Do we have a previous command?
    				if(i > 0) {
    					close(aPipe[1]);
    					dup2(aPipe[0], STDIN_FILENO);
    					close(aPipe[0]);
    				}

    				// Do we have a next command?
    				if(i < pCount-1) {
    					close(bPipe[0]);
    					dup2(bPipe[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
    					close(bPipe[1]);
    				}
    			}

    			execvp(cmdArgs[0], cmdArgs);
    			exit(1);
    		} else {
    			// Do we have a previous command?
    			if(i > 0) {
    				// Is this the first, third, fifth, etc... command?
    				if(i%2 == 0) {
    					close(bPipe[0]);
    					close(bPipe[1]);
    				}

    				// Is this the second, fourth, sixth, etc... command?
    				if(i%2 == 1) {
    					close(aPipe[0]);
    					close(aPipe[1]);
    				}
    			}

    			// wait for the last command? all others will run in the background
    			if(i == pCount-1) {
    				waitpid(pid, &status, 0);
    			}

    			// I know they will be left as zombies in the table
    			// Not relevant for this...
    		}
    	}
    }

    return 0;
}

This may not be the best and cleanest solution but it was something I could come up with and, most importantly, something I can understand. What good is to have something working that I don't understand and then I'm evaluated by my teacher and I can't explain to him what the code is doing?

Anyway, what do you think about this one?

share|improve this answer

This is my "final" code with ephemient suggestions:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <wait.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <readline/readline.h>
#include <readline/history.h>

#define NUMPIPES 5
#define NUMARGS 10

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char *bBuffer, *sPtr, *aPtr = NULL, *pipeComms[NUMPIPES], *cmdArgs[NUMARGS];
    int newPipe[2], oldPipe[2], pCount, aCount, i, status;
    pid_t pid;

    using_history();

    while(1) {
    	bBuffer = readline("\e[1;31mShell \e[1;32m# \e[0m");

    	if(!strcasecmp(bBuffer, "exit")) {
    		return 0;
    	}

    	if(strlen(bBuffer) > 0) {
    		add_history(bBuffer);
    	}

    	sPtr = bBuffer;
    	pCount = -1;

    	do {
    		aPtr = strsep(&sPtr, "|");

    		if(aPtr != NULL) {
    			if(strlen(aPtr) > 0) {
    				pipeComms[++pCount] = aPtr;
    			}
    		}
    	} while(aPtr);

    	cmdArgs[++pCount] = NULL;

    	for(i = 0; i < pCount; i++) {
    		aCount = -1;

    		do {
    			aPtr = strsep(&pipeComms[i], " ");

    			if(aPtr != NULL) {
    				if(strlen(aPtr) > 0) {
    					cmdArgs[++aCount] = aPtr;
    				}
    			}
    		} while(aPtr);

    		cmdArgs[++aCount] = NULL;

    		// do we have a next command?
    		if(i < pCount-1) {
    			pipe(newPipe);
    		}

    		pid = fork();

    		if(pid == 0) {
    			// do we have a previous command?
    			if(i > 0) {
    				close(oldPipe[1]);
    				dup2(oldPipe[0], 0);
    				close(oldPipe[0]);
    			}

    			// do we have a next command?
    			if(i < pCount-1) {
    				close(newPipe[0]);
    				dup2(newPipe[1], 1);
    				close(newPipe[1]);
    			}

    			// execute command...
    			execvp(cmdArgs[0], cmdArgs);
    			exit(1);
    		} else {
    			// do we have a previous command?
    			if(i > 0) {
    				close(oldPipe[0]);
    				close(oldPipe[1]);
    			}

    			// do we have a next command?
    			if(i < pCount-1) {
    				oldPipe[0] = newPipe[0];
    				oldPipe[1] = newPipe[1];
    			}

    			// wait for last command process?
    			if(i == pCount-1) {
    				waitpid(pid, &status, 0);
    			}
    		}
    	}
    }

    return 0;
}

Is it ok now?

share|improve this answer
1  
I haven't run it to be sure, but it looks fine. Little nits: it wouldn't hurt to take the condition out before oldPipe = newPipe; if (i == pcount - 1) could just be an else of the previous if, but I would move it out of the loop altogether. These don't change how your program runs, though; they're more stylistic concerns. –  ephemient Jun 4 '09 at 19:12
    
You're right about the second point, it makes more sense and the 'if' is unnecessary. But the whole wait code needs tweaking anyway cause I never wait for all he previous commands and they will become zombies this way. But really not important for this exercise. The first point though, I only followed your pseudo code on the answer above. But if I removed the condition, wouldn't I remain with 2 file descriptors opened in the last command? –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 5 '09 at 0:14
1  
It's just an assignment of numbers. The actual file descriptors in newPipe[] aren't in use when you're at the very last command. This really is just personal taste... it's unnecessary, but I like to eliminate conditionals. –  ephemient Jun 5 '09 at 0:20
    
Ok, thanks for the tip then :) –  Ricardo Amaral Jun 5 '09 at 0:26

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