Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I know there are a number of similar questions in stackoverflow such as the followings:

... and dozens more and I have studied them all.

The problem is that some of the accepted answers have suggested MAC address as an unique identifier which is entirely incorrect. Some other answers have suggested to use a combination of various components which seems more logical. However, in case of using a combination it should be considered which component is naturally unlikely to be changed frequently. A few days ago we developed a key generator for a software licensing issue where we used the combination of CPUID and MAC to identify a windows pc uniquely and till practical testing we thought our approach was good enough. Ironically when we went testing it we found three computers returning the same id with our key generator!

So, is there really any way to uniquely identify any computer at all? Right now we just need to make our key generator to work on windows pc. Some way (if possible at all) using c# would be great as our system is developed on .net.

Update:

Sorry for creating some confusions and an apparently false alarm. We found out some incorrectness in our method of retrieving HW info. Primarily I thought of deleting this question as now my own confusion has gone and I do believe that a combination of two or more components is good enough to identify a computer. However, then I decided to keep it because I think I should clarify what was causing the problem as the same thing might hurt some other guy in future.

This is what we were doing (excluding other codes):

We were using a getManagementInfo function to retrieve MAC and Processor ID

private String getManagementInfo(String StrKey_String, String strIndex)
    {
        String strHwInfo = null;
        try
        {
            ManagementObjectSearcher searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher("select * from " + StrKey_String);
            foreach (ManagementObject share in searcher.Get())
            {
                strHwInfo += share[strIndex];
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // show some error message
        }
        return strHwInfo;
    } 

Then where needed we used that function to retrieve MAC Address

string strMAC = getManagementInfo("Win32_NetworkAdapterConfiguration", "MacAddress");

and to retrieve ProcessorID

string strProcessorId = getManagementInfo("Win32_Processor", "ProcessorId");

At this point, strMAC would contain more than one MAC address if there are more than one. To take only one we just took the first 17 characters (12 MAC digits and 5 colons in between).

strMAC = strMAC.Length > 17 ? strMAC.Remove(17) : strMAC;

This is where we made the mistake. Because getManagementInfo("Win32_NetworkAdapterConfiguration", "MacAddress") was returning a number of extra MAC addresses that were really in use. For example, when we searched for MAC addresses in the command prompt by getmac command then it showed one or two MAC addresses for each pc which were all different. But getManagementInfo("Win32_NetworkAdapterConfiguration", "MacAddress") returned four to five MAC addresses some of which were identical for all computers. As we just took the first MAC address that our function returned instead of checking anything else, the identical MAC addresses were taken in strMAC incidently.

The following code by Sowkot Osman does the trick by returning only the first active/ enabled MAC address:

private static string macId()
    {
        return identifier("Win32_NetworkAdapterConfiguration", "MACAddress", "IPEnabled");
    }

private static string identifier(string wmiClass, string wmiProperty, string wmiMustBeTrue)
    {
        string result = "";
        System.Management.ManagementClass mc = new System.Management.ManagementClass(wmiClass);
        System.Management.ManagementObjectCollection moc = mc.GetInstances();
        foreach (System.Management.ManagementObject mo in moc)
        {
            if (mo[wmiMustBeTrue].ToString() == "True")
            {
                //Only get the first one
                if (result == "")
                {
                    try
                    {
                        result = mo[wmiProperty].ToString();
                        break;
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
    //Return a hardware identifier
    private static string identifier(string wmiClass, string wmiProperty)
    {
        string result = "";
        System.Management.ManagementClass mc = new System.Management.ManagementClass(wmiClass);
        System.Management.ManagementObjectCollection moc = mc.GetInstances();
        foreach (System.Management.ManagementObject mo in moc)
        {
            //Only get the first one
            if (result == "")
            {
                try
                {
                    result = mo[wmiProperty].ToString();
                    break;
                }
                catch
                {
                }
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

However, I was absolutely right about the identical Processor ID issue. All three returned the same Processor ID when we put wmic cpu get ProcessorId command in their command prompts.

Now we have decided to use Motherboard serial number instead of Processor ID to make a combination with MAC address. I think our purpose will be served with this way and if it doesn't in some cases then we should let it go in those few cases.

share|improve this question
6  
The simple answer has to be no. Since a PC is made of many interchangeable parts. Over time the only thing that may stay the same is the case. So the first thing you need to specify is which parts of the PC (in terms of hardware) you consider to be 'the PC'. Whatever you choose is going to be a compromise of some sort hence the ambiguity or in-correctness in your view of the previous answers. –  James Gaunt Feb 28 '12 at 12:56
    
I believe the TPM could help, but it is usually available on business class laptops, and disabled by default. +1 for your study of the subject! –  ixe013 Feb 28 '12 at 12:59
3  
If you're using CPUID and MAC Address to identify the machine and three machines are returning the same ID, then there's a bug in your code. MAC addresses are globally unique, assigned at the factory. –  Paul Alexander Feb 28 '12 at 19:02
1  
MAC addresses can be changed/ spoofed and so it can be unwise to rely on this as a single method of authentication. That's why we decided to use a combination of both MAC and CPUID influenced by the suggestions given by @Paul Alexander and others from the previously posted similar questions. Getting same id even after that is very weird and bizarre. We used another software to re-check the issue and that also returned same MAC and Processor ID for two computers out of three and we haven't tested on the third one yet. –  Sajib Mahmood Feb 29 '12 at 6:53
1  
If you're going to insist on using the motherboard serial number please make sure your code can cope if retrieving the serial number doesn't work. It probably isn't possible for a virtual machine, for example, and might not be possible even on real hardware in some cases. (I still think it's a bad decision, because it leaves the user completely stuck if the motherboard in question dies, which is lousy customer relations.) –  Harry Johnston Feb 29 '12 at 21:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The fact in getting a globally unique ID is, only MAC address is the ID that will not change if you set up your system all over. IF you are generating a key for a specific product, the best way to do it is assigning unique IDs for products and combining the product ID with MAC address. Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
combining the product ID with MAC address seems to be a really good idea. +1 –  Sajib Mahmood Feb 29 '12 at 20:14
    
Please Don't panic about the name change. I just merged two of my accounts. Still the same person as before. :) Sorry for this comment considering it inconvenient to this post. –  HUNKY_Monkey Mar 3 '12 at 5:09
    
Not a problem at all. BTW can you answer this: stackoverflow.com/questions/9546228/… –  Sajib Mahmood Mar 3 '12 at 12:44
1  
MAC address can be changed by users. –  ANeves Jul 3 '14 at 11:07

How about adding motherboard serial number as well e.g.:

using System.management;


//Code for retrieving motherboard's serial number
ManagementObjectSearcher MOS = new ManagementObjectSearcher("Select * From Win32_BaseBoard");
foreach (ManagementObject getserial in MOS.Get())
{
textBox1.Text = getserial["SerialNumber"].ToString();
}

//Code for retrieving Processor's Identity
MOS = new ManagementObjectSearcher("Select * From Win32_processor");
foreach (ManagementObject getPID in MOS.Get())
{
textBox2.Text = getPID["ProcessorID"].ToString();
}

//Code for retrieving Network Adapter Configuration
MOS = new ManagementObjectSearcher("Select * From Win32_NetworkAdapterConfiguration");
foreach (ManagementObject mac in MOS.Get())
{
textBox3.Text = mac["MACAddress"].ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
helpful tips, thanks. I'll wait for more answers before accepting though. +1 anyway :) –  Sajib Mahmood Feb 28 '12 at 17:29
2  
Does this require admin privilege? –  Harry Johnston Feb 29 '12 at 21:07
    
for anybody who get "Base Board Serial Number" see stackoverflow.com/q/1290533/184572 –  imanabidi Sep 25 '13 at 23:07

I Completely agree with just the above comment.

For Software licensening, you can use:

Computer MAC Address (Take all if multiple NIC Card) + Your software Product Code

Most of the renowned telecom vendor is using this technique.

share|improve this answer

However, I was absolutely right about the identical Processor ID issue. All three returned the same Processor ID when we put wmic cpu get ProcessorId command in their command prompts.

Processor ID will be same if all the systems are running as virtual machines on the same hypervisor.

MAC ID seems fine. Only thing is users must be provided the option to reset the application, in case the MAC changes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.