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In my application i want to store some secure data by encrypting it. When the user wants i need to show it to him by decrypting it. This is working fine. But the problem is i need to store both encrypted message and initialization vector for every message. This initialization vector is generated while encrypting and i have to use this while decrypting to get the original message.

So if the user stores 1000 messages i need to store those 1000 encrypted messages and corresponding 1000 initialization vectors.I want to avoid storing initialization vector for every message.

Please tell me the way to AES-256 encryption with out Initialization vector.

Below is my code for encrypting and decrypting

/*
     * This method will do the AES-256 encryption.
     */
    private byte[] encrypt(char[] raw, String cardno) {
     //  This raw is some unique key like password.      
        SecretKeyFactory factory = null;
        SecretKey tmp = null;
        Cipher cipher = null;
        byte[] ciphertext = null;
        AlgorithmParameters params = null;
        try {
            factory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBEWITHSHA-256AND256BITAES-CBC-BC");
        } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        KeySpec spec = new PBEKeySpec(raw, mSalt, 1024, 256);

        try {
            if (factory != null)
                tmp = factory.generateSecret(spec);
        } catch (InvalidKeySpecException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        if (tmp != null)
            mSecret = new SecretKeySpec(tmp.getEncoded(), "AES");

        try {
            cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (NoSuchPaddingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        try {
            if (cipher != null)
                cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, mSecret);
        } catch (InvalidKeyException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        if (cipher != null)
            params = cipher.getParameters();
        try {

            mIV = params.getParameterSpec(IvParameterSpec.class).getIV();

        } catch (InvalidParameterSpecException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        try {
            ciphertext = cipher.doFinal(cardno.getBytes("UTF-8"));
        } catch (IllegalBlockSizeException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (BadPaddingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return ciphertext;

    }





/*
     * This will decrypt the encrypted data based on provided key
     */
    private byte[] decrypt(byte[] raw, byte[] encrypted) throws Exception {
        //This raw is initialization vector generated while encrypting 
        Cipher cipher = null;
        byte[] decrypted = null;

        try {
            cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (NoSuchPaddingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        try {
            cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, mSecret, new IvParameterSpec(raw));
        } catch (InvalidKeyException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (InvalidAlgorithmParameterException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        try {
            decrypted = cipher.doFinal(encrypted);
        } catch (IllegalBlockSizeException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (BadPaddingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }


        return decrypted;
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To be secure, you must use an initialization vector (and a unique one) for each message. There is no way to get around it.

share|improve this answer
    
While probably not relevant to the OP, to be precise, one could use a unique key for every message. In that case, the IV could be null without losing any security, as the source of randomness is now the key itself. See crypto.stackexchange.com/a/8601 –  Raman Jan 7 at 22:36

A better way is to simply add the initialization vector at the start of each encrypted message you save. As the padding already may add some bytes to the message, this should not matter much regarding the use case.

Don't forget, the IV always has a fixed size for a particular block cipher: the block size, which you can retrieve using cipher.getBlockSize() in Java. You can simply use cipher.doFinal(buf, offset, length) instead of cipher.doFinal(buf) after retrieving the IV.

If you really don't want to store the IV, you could calculate the IV from the full path name (the absolute path, or from some root, if needed), and perform a hash such as SHA-256 over it. As long as the path is unique, the SHA-256 should be relatively close to a known but random IV, which is what would be most safe. Of course, if you rename/move the file...

Note that you are trying to safe yourself only about 16KB of initialization vector (1000 x 16, which is the block size). That's not a lot.

share|improve this answer
    
Anything missing from my answer, sankar? –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Mar 8 '12 at 20:11

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