Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make a "fade-in fade-out" effect using the css transisition. But I can't get this to work with the background image... I have this css:

.title a {
    display: block;
    width: 340px;
    height: 338px;
    color: black;
    background: transparent;
    /* TRANSISITION */
    transition: background 1s;
    -webkit-transition: background 1s;
    -moz-transition: background 1s;
    -o-transition: background 1s;
}

.title a:hover {
    background: transparent;
    background: url(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-p1nr1fkWKUo/T0zUp5CLO3I/AAAAAAAAAWg/jDiQ0cUBuKA/s800/red-pattern.png) repeat;
    /* TRANSISITION */
    transition: background 1s;
    -webkit-transition: background 1s;
    -moz-transition: background 1s;
    -o-transition: background 1s;
}​

Take a look: http://jsfiddle.net/AK3La/

thanks for your help.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

You can transition background-image. Use the CSS below on the img element:

-webkit-transition: background-image 0.2s ease-in-out;
-moz-transition: background-image 0.2s ease-in-out;
-ms-transition: background-image 0.2s ease-in-out;
-o-transition: background-image 0.2s ease-in-out;
transition: background-image 0.2s ease-in-out;

This is supported natively by Chrome, Opera and Safari. Firefox hasn't implemented it yet (bugzil.la). Not sure about IE.

share|improve this answer
5  
background-image is not an animatable property (w3.org/TR/css3-transitions/#animatable-properties), so your solution is not standard compliant. –  TLindig May 20 at 8:08
1  
This is not a solution - FF and IE do not support it, and as noted above it's not a property the spec says should be supported. –  Sentinel May 23 at 7:45

If you can use jQuery, you can try BgSwitcher plugin to switch the background-image with effects, it's very easy to use.

For example :

$('.bgSwitch').bgswitcher({
        images: ["style/img/bg0.jpg","style/img/bg1.jpg","style/img/bg2.jpg"],
        effect: "fade",
        interval: 10000
});

And add your own effect, see adding an effect types

share|improve this answer

Unfortunately you can't use transition on background-image, see the w3c list of animatable properties.

You may want to do some tricks with background-position, here is an example.

share|improve this answer

I've figured out a solution that worked for me...

If you have a list item (or div) containing only the link, and let's say this is for social links on your page to facebook, twitter, ect. and you're using a sprite image you can do this:

<li id="facebook"><a href="facebook.com"></a></li>

Make the "li"s background your button image

#facebook {
   width:30px;
   height:30px;
   background:url(images/social) no-repeat 0px 0px;
}

Then make the link's background image the hover state of the button. Also add the opacity attribute to this and set it to 0.

#facebook a {
   display:inline-block;
   background:url(images/social) no-repeat 0px -30px;
   opacity:0;
}

Now all you need is "opacity" under "a:hover" and set this to 1.

#facebook a:hover {
   opacity:1;
}

Add the opacity transition attributes for each browser to "a" and "a:hover" so the the final css will look something like this:

#facebook {
   width:30px;
   height:30px;
   background:url(images/social) no-repeat 0px 0px;
}
#facebook a {
   display:inline-block;
   background:url(images/social) no-repeat 0px -30px;
   opacity:0;
   -webkit-transition: opacity 200ms linear;
   -moz-transition: opacity 200ms linear;
   -o-transition: opacity 200ms linear;
   -ms-transition: opacity 200ms linear;
   transition: opacity 200ms linear;
}
#facebook a:hover {
   opacity:1;
   -webkit-transition: opacity 200ms linear;
   -moz-transition: opacity 200ms linear;
   -o-transition: opacity 200ms linear;
   -ms-transition: opacity 200ms linear;
   transition: opacity 200ms linear;
}

If I explained it correctly that should let you have a fading background image button, hope it helps at least!

share|improve this answer
3  
I also made a video tutorial version of it. youtube.com/watch?v=6ieR5ApVpr0 –  Austin Parrish Thomas Feb 28 '13 at 22:23

The solution (that I found by myself) is a ninja trick, I can offer you two ways:

first you need to make a "container" for the <img>, it will contain normal and hover states at the same time:

<div class="images-container">
    <img src="http://lorempixel.com/400/200/animals/9/">
    <img src="http://lorempixel.com/400/200/animals/10/">
</div>

Basically, you need to hide "normal" state and show their "hover" when you hover it

and that's it, I hope somebody find it useful.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution. When experimenting with the first sample, I noticed that if you increase the transition duration to 4s, you can see a very noticable jump when the z-index switches in the middle of the transition. At least on Chrome 35, you can shift the timing of the z-index switch and clean up the transition by changing the property value to "all 4s ease, z-index 1ms" (jsfiddle.net/eD2zL/330). –  Neal S. Jul 1 at 17:55
    
@NealS. you're right. This answer is 2 years old though, I would remove z-index, it seems unnecessary. The images just need to be in order. –  Ruffo Jul 1 at 19:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.