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Consider an asynchronous operation like obtaining search results from a data storage. Now I want it to be possible, to cancel a currently pending search operation, to start a new one, that in fact replaces the active search, mostly because the search parameters changed meanwhile.

My search is started via TPL (.NET 4.0) new Task and eventually has Continues and of course has callbacks, that invoke UI-Methods on UI-Context.

So, if the search button is pressed again, while search tast is running, I firstly have to stop current task and wait for it to end. If I do that from UI thread, I may run into a deadlock, since Wait() on UI thread blocks it, so a possible Invoke() will never execute.

Therefore, in my current solution, I start a separate task, which waits for running tasks to end/abort and then runs the new ones. This feels a bit bulky and cumbersome and I wonder, if there ain't no more elegant way, since I need this kind of mechanism frequently.

So am I maybe missing a framework mechanism that's usable for this kind of scenario? Or what would be a more recommended way?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe this is what you are looking for. I have commented the code so most of the reasoning is embedded in the code.

Basically, have your continue functions deal with spinning up a prepped Task.

Task currentTask;
CancellationTokenSource cancelTokenSource;
CancellationToken cancelToken;
Task newTask;
CancellationTokenSource newCancelTokenSource;
CancellationToken newCancelToken;

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
}

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if(currentTask != null && currentTask.Status == TaskStatus.Running)
    {
        //Cancel the running task
        cancelTokenSource.Cancel();
        //Prepare a new Task to be triggered when the other cancels
        //You could store new tasks/tokens in a dictionary if you wanted,also
        //A new cancel token is always needed since the old stays cancelled
        newCancelTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
        newCancelToken = newCancelTokenSource.Token;
        newTask = new Task(()=>LongRunningTask(), newCancelToken);

        //Continue that deals with both cancel and completion
        //There is a different way to deal with this below, also
        newTask.ContinueWith((previousTask)=>
        {
            if(previousTask.Status == TaskStatus.Cancelled)
            {
                label1.Text = "New Task Cancelled, Another New Starting";
                BeginNewTask();
            }
            else
                label1.Text = "New Task Ran To Completion";
        },
        //If cancelled token is passed, it will autoskip the continue
        new CancellationTokenSource().Token, TaskContinuationOptions.None,
        //This is to auto invoke the UI thread
        TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
    }
    else
    {
        cancelTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
        cancelToken = cancelTokenSource.Token;
        //Start a fresh task since none running
        currentTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(()=>LongRunningTask(), 
            cancelToken);

        //OnCancelContinue
        currentTask.ContinueWith((previousTask)=>
        {
            label1.Text = "First Task Cancelled, New Starting";
            BeginNewTask();
        },
        //If cancelled token is passed, it will autoskip the continue
        new CancellationTokenSource().Token, 
        TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCancelled,
        //This is to auto invoke the UI thread
        TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

        //OnCompleteContinue
        currentTask.ContinueWith((previousTask)=>
        {
            label1.Text = "First Task Ran To Completion";
        },
        //If cancelled token is passed, it will autoskip the continue
        new CancellationTokenSource().Token, 
        TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion,
        //This is to auto invoke the UI thread
        TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
    }
}

private void LongRunningTask()
{
     for(int i = 0; i < 60; i++)
     {
         if(cancelToken.IsCancellationRequested)
             cancelToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
         Thread.Sleep(1000);
     }
}

private void BeginNewTask()
{
    //Since the old task is cancelled, reset it with the new one
    //Probably should do some error checks
    currentTask = newTask;
    cancelTokenSource = newCancelTokenSource;
    cancelToken = newCancelToken;
    //This is to make sure this task does not run on the UI thread
    currentTask.Start(TaskScheduler.Default);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. So it seems, I went into the right direction. :-) –  Andreas H. Feb 28 '12 at 18:18
    
Yah, taking full advantage of the ContinueWith is the key to this piece :) –  Justin Pihony Feb 28 '12 at 19:03

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