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#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
public:

virtual void f() = 0;   
};

class B: public A
{
public:

void f()
{
//   f();   //segmentation Fault
cout<<"\bB's f() called"<<endl;
f();    //recursive loop
}
};

void A:: f()
{
cout<<"\nA's f() called"<<endl;
}

   int main()
   {

     A *ptr;
     B b;

     ptr = &b;
     b.f();

  return 0;
  }

Q-> In this problem.. inside the B class f( ), if we call f( ) before "cout<<" statement it gives segmentation fault and after "cout<<" statement it gives recursive loop. Why segmentation fault is coming. Thanks in Advance :)

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What were you expecting to happen? –  Mat Feb 28 '12 at 15:20
    
My guess is that the question is not on why he gets a stack overflow - the question seems to be on why he gets varying results depending on the location of his recursive call. –  Till Feb 28 '12 at 15:22

4 Answers 4

When you make the recursive call at the end of a function, the compiler optimizes your stack use, perhaps eliminating it. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tail_call. The reason of segmentation fault is stackoverflow!

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Placing f() before the cout<< causes f() to be called recursively an infinite amount of times before the first cout<< happens. Both of your problems are the same conceptually, but provide different output.

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1  
The reason for the difference is a compiler optimization in the second case. Normally, both should result in a segfault due to a stackoverflow sooner or later. –  Björn Pollex Feb 28 '12 at 15:21

The recursive loop is the cause of the problems. It will never and, and the call stack will fill up.

You're missing a halting condition.

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You are getting a stackoverflow due to your infinite loop. You would also get one eventually with the call to f() after the cout << ... but it gets there quicker with it before. I wouldn't be surprised if the compiler does some optimisation that affects this as well.

You need to add some way of breaking out of your recursive loop.

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