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class B
{

private:
int _x;
public:
int get(){return _x;};
B(int x=10):_x(x){cout<<"Default constructor "<<endl;}
~B(){cout<<"destructor "<<endl;}
B(const B &rhs){cout<<"copy constructor"<<endl;}
B& operator =(const B &rhs){cout<<"copy assignment operator"<<endl;}
int operator *(){cout<<"operator *"<<endl;return _x;}
};

int main()
{
vector<B> v;
int i;
vector<B>::iterator ii=v.begin();

for(i=0;i<1;i++)
{
 v.push_back(*(new B(i*100)));
}
ii = v.begin();
cout<<"#####################"<<endl;
ii = v.insert(ii+1,*(new B()));
cout<<"#####################"<<endl;

return 0;
}

Output:

   Default constructor 
   copy constructor
   #####################
   Default constructor 
   1. copy constructor
   2. copy constructor
   destructor 
   #####################
   destructor 
   destructor 

Why is that at v.insert(ii,*(new B()));, two copy constructors are called ??

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3  
C++ is not Java. You should never write anything like: push_back(*(new B(i*100))). It creates an instance of B on the heap then forget about it. Doing thing you are basically leaking memory. You can just use push_back(B(i*100)) or in your case push_back(i * 100) since your B class can be implicitely constructed. –  ereOn Feb 28 '12 at 15:30

2 Answers 2

First of all you have memory leaks as you don't delete the memory allocated from new.The correct way of doing what you want to do is v.push_back(B(100));.

Regarding why the copy ctor is called twice,it looks like on second insert the vector has reached its capacity and is reallocating. During this reallocation it copies the previously inserted elements into the newly allocated memory. Hence you see the copy ctor being called twice.

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A far worse problem is that *(new B()) is a memory leak - you copy a dynamically-allocated object, and then throw away the only pointer to it. You should create a temporary object instead:

v.insert(ii+1, B());

To answer the question: since vectors are stored as contiguous blocks of memory, it's sometimes necessary to increase the capacity as they grow. When this happens, all the objects in the array must be copied (or moved) to their new location. So here you see one copy to move the existing element, and a second to insert the new one.

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