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Following this example .. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/gg685489

I am running into issues with Delete functionality.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Delete(int id, Blog blog)
{
    try
    {
        using (var db = new BlogDataEntities())
        {
            //Having issue here.. as soon as the next line is run in debug
            //mode .. it goes to catch.. and returns a view with null values.

            db.Entry(blog).State = System.Data.EntityState.Deleted;
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
    catch
    {
        return View();
    }
}

In the parameters I checked 'blog' does not get the actual blog model that needs to be deleted. All the other methods work fine (Edit, Delete (get)..etc.. but Delete post fails. Am I missing something? thanks in advance for the help.

EDIT:

view code

@model DBFirstMVC.Models.Blog

@{
 ViewBag.Title = "Delete";
 }

  <h2>Delete</h2>

<h3>Are you sure you want to delete this?</h3>
<fieldset>
<legend>Blog</legend>

<div class="display-label">Title</div>
<div class="display-field">@Model.Title</div>

<div class="display-label">BloggerName</div>
<div class="display-field">@Model.BloggerName</div>
 </fieldset>
@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
  <p>
    <input type="submit" value="Delete" /> |
    @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index")
  </p>
 }

EDIT 2: Non Razor Code in view:

<% using (Html.BeginForm()) { %>
<p>
    <input type="submit" value="Delete" /> |
    <%: Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index") %>
</p>
<% } %>

EDIT 3: (I tried in aspx)

<% using (Html.BeginForm()) { %>
<p>

    <%=Html.DisplayForModel();%> //Tried Html.EditorForModel also..
    <input type="submit" value="Delete" /> |
    <%: Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index") %>
</p>
<% } %>

FINAL EDIT (Corrected Solution)

@model DBFirstMVC.Models.Blog

@{
 ViewBag.Title = "Delete";
}

<h2>Delete</h2>

<h3>Are you sure you want to delete this?</h3>

@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
 <p>
<fieldset>
<legend>Blog</legend>

<div class="display-label">Title</div>
<div class="display-field">@Model.Title</div>

<div class="display-label">BloggerName</div>
<div class="display-field">@Model.BloggerName</div>

  <input type="submit" value="Delete" /> |
@Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index")
</fieldset>
</p>
}
share|improve this question
    
Catch the exception and see what is the problem –  Eranga Feb 28 '12 at 15:55
    
@ZVenue I have updated my answer with your new details. You aren't passing enough data for it to construct your model. –  Dismissile Feb 28 '12 at 17:04
    
Please see EDIT2 in OP for non razor syntax.. how can I write the EditorForModel in non razor ? –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 17:21
    
Still not working, please see my new EDITs in OP. thank you –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 17:56
1  
I posted an answer regarding separating concerns in your code for posterity, but the point that @Dismissile is making is the right answer. –  Chase Florell Feb 28 '12 at 18:24
show 4 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The context probably doesn't have an Entry for your Blog because it isn't attached to the Context.

You probably need to retrieve the Blog first and then mark it as deleted using the Entry method:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Delete(int id, Blog blog)
{
    try
    {
        using (var db = new BlogDataEntities())
        {
            // retrieve the blog from the database
            var realBlog = db.Blogs.Find(blog.Id);

           // nothing to do here, just redirect
           if( realBlog == null )
                return RedirectToAction("Index");

          // since you have the entity just do this instead:
          db.Blogs.Remove(realBlog);
          db.SaveChanges();
        } 

        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
    catch( Exception )
    {
        return View();
    }
}

I don't really agree with the idea of using your entities as your models though. You should use View Models instead.

EDIT

Since you now are saying that Blog isn't being passed, try this:

@model Blog

@using ( Html.BeginForm() )
{
    @Html.EditorForModel()

    <input type="submit" value="Delete" />
}

You weren't actually giving the model binder any of the details it needed to construct your model.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried your solution.. I think the fault lies somewhere.. I am missing something very simple here.. the Blog is not being passed at all.. public ActionResult Delete(int id, Blog blog) the blog is null here.. the Delete GET method shows me the complete blog record correctly.. but when I click on the delete button, and the POST method is called.. and here I see the blog is not being passed.. its passing a null for blog.. –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 16:29
    
@ZVenue Updated the answer. Try putting in @Html.EditorForModel() in your view in the form tag. –  Dismissile Feb 28 '12 at 17:05
    
+1 dismissile for arriving at the solution. i knew there must have been something amiss in the delete view (hence my comment asking for it).. –  jim tollan Feb 28 '12 at 17:12
    
How do you write this in non razor syntax.. <% Html.EditorForModel()%> or <% Html.EditorForModel();%> doesnt seem to work –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 17:16
3  
Although it works, it adds unneeded overhead to your application. Why pass around the entire Blog object when a delete only requires the id of the blog post? Seems like firing a missile at a pesky mosquito. The only time you need to pass the entire Blog object is on Create, Read, Update. –  Chase Florell Feb 28 '12 at 23:03
show 6 more comments

is it possible to try the following:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Delete(Blog deletedBlog)
{
    try
    {
        using (var db = new BlogDataEntities())
        {
            // get blog entry from db context!!
            Blog blog = db.Blogs.Find(deletedBlog.Id);
            //Having issue here.. as soon as the next line is run in debug
            //mode .. it goes to catch.. and returns a view with null values.

            db.Entry(blog).State = System.Data.EntityState.Deleted;
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        // should catch more specific exception
        // but catching 'e' should be a start
        return View();
    }
}

[Update] - pass in your Blog model from the view, tho as Dismissile says, you should really use a viewmodel, rather than the entity model for this purpose.

Also, you should catch the inner exception message and examine that for further clues.

share|improve this answer
    
Only issue with this is I already have a method like that to "GET" Delete.. public ActionResult Delete(int id) { using (var db = new BlogDataEntities()) { return View(db.Blogs.Find(id)); } } –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 16:22
    
ahh, of course. was thinking too slowly there. you would of course need a viewmodel passed back to the HttpPost action. I'll amend my answer a tad... –  jim tollan Feb 28 '12 at 16:23
    
Same thing here.. please see my comment for the other solution.. I am not passing the blog correctly.. what am I missing? In this case, the deletedBlog is a null when its getting passed to the method.. why would the model not get passed on click on the delete button? –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 16:33
    
what does your razor view code look like in the Delete.cshtml. pop that in your question as i think it my help a lot –  jim tollan Feb 28 '12 at 16:38
    
Please see OP Edit. Yes it is true that blog model is not being passed.. but Edit view code and action code works the same way and Edit action works fine.. it gets the blog model passed.. Delete code is very similar if you look at the code in the sample.. but still the blog is not being passed.. is there a way to force the view to pass the model to controller... –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 16:57
show 1 more comment

The blog parameter in your Delete Action is null most likely because you are only posting the blog's id, not the entire blog object. I would either modify the Delete Action to accept just the id (per Dismissile's answer), or modify the Delete View to post the entire blog object and remove the id from the Action (since it belongs to the blog object):

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Delete(Blog blog)
{
    try
    {
        using (var db = new BlogDataEntities())
        {
            db.Entry(blog).State = System.Data.EntityState.Deleted;
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
    catch
    {
        return View();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The code does not clearly say its posting Id or blog .. its just a delete button .. please see Edit in OP. Edit has the similar code and it passes the blog successfully. –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 16:58
2  
@ZVenue - The reason that the Edit Action receives a non-null blog model is because the view posts a form containing all parameters necessary to construct the blog object. In the case of delete, the only parameter being passed is the id (which comes from the querystring). –  RoccoC5 Feb 28 '12 at 17:19
    
+1 for your comment. –  ZVenue Feb 28 '12 at 19:39
add comment

I posted this in a few comments, but I felt it merited a separate answer for an "alternative".

Your controllers should be slim and adhere as best as possible to the single responsibility principle.

BlogController

public class BlogController : Controller
{
    private BlogService blogService;

    public BlogService()
    {
        blogService = new BlogService();
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Delete(int id)
    {

        // make sure the user has permission to delete before actually deleting

        // now that we know the user has permission
        if (blogService.Delete(id))
        {
            return RedirectToAction("Index");
        }
        else
        {
            return View();
        }
    }
}

Now you'll have a reusable service layer that adheres to the single responsibility principle.

BlogService

public class BlogService
{

    private BlogDataEntities dc;

    public BlogService()
    {
        dc = new BlogDataEntities();
    }

    public bool Delete(int Id)
    {
        try
        {
            var blog= (from b in dc.Blogs where Blog.ID == Id select b).First();

           // blog doesn't exist, exit and return false.
           if( blog == null )
                return false;

          // blog exists, remove it
          dc.Blogs.Remove(blog);

          // push the delete to the database
          SaveChanges();

          // it worked, return true.
          return true;
        }
        catch(System.Exception ex)
        {
            // an error happened, handle it and return false.
            return false;
        }
    }

    // I like to keep my `SubmitChanges()` Separate in case I need to 
    // stack up a few processes before hitting the database.
    public void SaveChanges()
    {
        dc.SaveChanges();
    }  
}
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