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I have two classes as

class A{
 public function Get($a='0',$b=''){
  retrun 0;
 }
}

class B extends A{
 public function Get($a){
  return 0;
 }
}

It was working in local machine with PHP 5.2.5 when I migrated the application on live server with PHP 5.3.4 it is giving the following error:

Declaration of B::Get() should be compatible with that of A::get() 

What should I do? I cant change the PHP version of remote server.

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i dont think its an error, its just an notice. the easiest fix is to add the seond param to the function eg. function get($a, $b=NULL) so you dont need to give the second param, but the declaration is the same for both. –  Rufinus Feb 28 '12 at 16:01
    
But I have such millions of functions –  Kutta Feb 28 '12 at 16:02
    
just a guess, but are you using interfaces? nevermind - can you check if its an error or a notice ? if so, you may be able to disable this kind of notices in the php.ini or (.htaccess or ini_set() ) .. look for E_STRICT (afaik) –  Rufinus Feb 28 '12 at 16:06

3 Answers 3

The function declarations for Get() need to match for both class A and B, that is they need to have same number of parameters. From your example above, it appears that A::Get() takes 2 parameters and B::Get() only takes one. They both need to take 2.

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But I have millions of such functions in my application –  Kutta Feb 28 '12 at 16:02
    
It's not recommended, but you can suppress the errors by turning off E_STRICT errors. –  mmcnickle Feb 28 '12 at 16:06

Basically the root of you problem is broken API.

If you have two classes which have two completely different methods , then one cannot be a subclass of other. It's just wrong.

But lets assume that there is nothing you can do about this. In that case, the easiest way to fix would be to change the declaration of B::get() :

class B extends A
{
    public function get( $a , $b = null )
    {
       return $this->do_something_with( $a );
    }
}

This way you can completely ignore the second parameter and it won't be required.

But this is a bad idea.

But keep in mind , that the whole situation is cause by violation of Liskov substitution principle. The image should help to understand it :

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
class A{
 public function Get($a='0',$b=''){
  retrun 0;
 }
}

class B extends A{
 public function Get($a){
  return parent::Get($a,null);
 }
}

it is working with php 5.3.5.

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