Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Edit

I want to get the divisor of natural numbers N.

for (int i=1;i<n/2;i++)
 if(n%i==0)
    print(i);

How can we compare the number was less than n/2 ? I wants to find all the factors in less than n/2 steps

share|improve this question
    
I removed the Mathematica tag, I don't see it as applicable here. – High Performance Mark Feb 28 '12 at 16:07
1  
You probably want n%i==0 – asaelr Feb 28 '12 at 16:07
    
It should be n%i==0 for starters. – Philip Sheard Feb 28 '12 at 16:08
    
Just a general note on all answers below who do i <= sqrt(n), it's almost always better to check i*i <= n. – aelguindy Feb 28 '12 at 18:54
    
guys... using sqrt(n) is not correct if you are looking for all factors. – John Feb 29 '12 at 2:48

If I understand you correctly, you want to determine if i is less than n/2?

Try this:

if (i < n/2)
    print(i);
share|improve this answer
    
I think the Ma wants to find all the factors in less than n/2 steps. – ElKamina Feb 28 '12 at 16:13
    
Ahh, I thought that this was a bit simple. – Peter Feb 28 '12 at 16:13

You can actually do this in sqrt(n) steps, as follows:

for(int i = 1;i <= sqrt(n);i++)
{
  if(n % i == 0)
  {
    print(i);
    if(i != sqrt(n))
      print(n / i);
  }
}

This will print each divisor of n once. Note that, like in the example code, I have assumed a print function that could be implemented as follows:

void print(int i)
{
  printf("%d\n", i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
for number '24' this is wrong – Ma Eb Mar 5 '12 at 21:51
    
@MaEb Its not completely clear what you're looking for. This correctly prints all of the factors of n. For n = 24, it prints 1 24 2 12 3 8 4 6. – Aaron Dufour Mar 5 '12 at 22:20

Both

for(int i=1;i<n;i++) 

and

for(int i=1;i<n/2;i++)

works but the second is more efficient. The divisors of a number wouldn't exceed half of it. For example, factors of 100 will definitely be less than and equal to 50.

There are many other efficient algorithms out there.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean to write that the second is more efficient ? – High Performance Mark Feb 28 '12 at 16:13
    
Oops typo. Edited it. thanks – John Feb 28 '12 at 16:15
    
If you take your idea one step further, you can go for sqrt(n) and not just n/2. – Neowizard Feb 28 '12 at 18:40
    
he is not going for prime number calculation. doing sqrt(100), the loop runs for i = 1 to 10 so you miss factors like 50. – John Feb 29 '12 at 2:43

If I understand you correctly, you are looking for all divisors of some number N?

Try this:

for(int i=1;i<n/2;i++)
{
   if(n%i == 0)
    printf("%d\n",i);
}
share|improve this answer

try:

for(int i=1;  i < (n/2); ++i)
    if (n%i==0)
         printf("%d\n",i);

how about this optimization (you need only up to the square root):

for(int i=1;  i < sqrt(n); ++i)
    if (n%i==0)
        printf("%d\n",i);

Or this one, you cover odd numbers only (useful if you check primes):

for(int i=1;  i < sqrt(n); i+=2)
    if (n%i==0)
         printf("%d\n",i);
share|improve this answer
    
for 16 this is bad.print 1,2,4 – Ma Eb Feb 28 '12 at 16:31
    
Note that, in your last example, n=26 will only print 1. You can't skip 2 or evens will be a problem. – Aaron Dufour Feb 28 '12 at 18:03

How about first doing the division and storing in a variable so that it is not calculated on each iteration of the FOR loop:

int num = Convert.ToInt32(n/2);
for (int i = 1 ; i < num; i++)
share|improve this answer
    
That makes no sense on various levels. ToIn32? It's already an int32. Besides the tag is C, not C#. 'Optimizing' away that division? Sometimes a good idea, not in this case. It won't be a division anyway, and chances are it'll be moved outside the loop automatically. – harold Feb 28 '12 at 16:21
    
This will almost always be done by the compiler anyway. Don't bother. – Aaron Dufour Feb 28 '12 at 17:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.