Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of values like:

["a", 1, "b", 2, "c", 3]

and I would like to build such a dict from it:

{"a": 1, "b": 2, "c": 3}

What is the natural way to do it in Python?

share|improve this question
3  
How did you get this list in the first place? The loop which created that list should be fixed to create the dictionary directly. –  S.Lott Feb 28 '12 at 16:17
    
@S.Lott: The list is the result of re.findall call –  izhak Feb 28 '12 at 16:54
1  
Please update the question with that important information. It might help to should be original RE, also, since there may be ways to simplify your processing. –  S.Lott Feb 28 '12 at 17:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted
>>> x = ["a", 1, "b", 2, "c", 3]
>>> i = iter(x)
>>> dict(zip(i, i))
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1: Nice use of iter to alternate elements –  Praveen Gollakota Feb 28 '12 at 16:10
4  
Assuming which argument zip will parse first seems wrong to me somehow... –  cha0site Feb 28 '12 at 16:12
4  
@cha0site The left-to-right evaluation order of the iterables is guaranteed. –  Josh Lee Feb 28 '12 at 16:13
1  
Thanks, this is the way! I even defined my list of items as x = (...) instead of [...] and got rid of explicit iter() call. –  izhak Feb 28 '12 at 16:14
1  
@Josh: It appears you are right, according to the zip docs. +1 then =) –  cha0site Feb 28 '12 at 16:16

This seems rather succint, but I wouldn't call it very natural:

>>> l = ["a", 1, "b", 2, "c", 3]
>>> dict(zip(l[::2], l[1::2]))
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}
share|improve this answer

You can zip the lists of alternate elements like so

>>> lst = ["a", 1, "b", 2, "c", 3]
>>> dict(zip(lst[::2], lst[1::2])
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}
share|improve this answer

Another way:

>>> l = ["a", 1, "b", 2, "c", 3]
>>> dict([l[i:i+2] for i in range(0,len(l),2)])
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2}
share|improve this answer

I don't really see many situations where you would run into this exact problem, so there is no 'natural' solution. A quick one liner that should do the trick for you would be however:

   {input_list[2*i]:input_list[2*i+1] for i in range(len(input_list)//2)}
share|improve this answer
    
I doubt that this will work. Also do not use builtin names (input) for variables. In Python 2.7 it simply fails on the for and in Python 3 it mourns about the argument for range being float. –  Nobody Feb 28 '12 at 16:09
    
Why shouldn't this work ? –  Bogdan Feb 28 '12 at 16:13
    
Tried it in python 2.7.1 before posting. Not sure how it translates to other versions. –  Bogdan Feb 28 '12 at 16:15
    
Look at ideone.com/K22Oa and ideone.com/XjKXl as well as ideone.com/Q2RS1 –  Nobody Feb 28 '12 at 16:20
1  
@Nobody: this works fine in 2.7; your ideone link is to 2.6, which doesn't have dict comprehensions. Changing / to // would make it work in 3 as well. –  DSM Feb 28 '12 at 16:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.