Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I have one row with 5 cells. The widths of the inner 3 are static. The first and last (far left and far right) should expand to fill the page so the inner 3 are centered. The outer cells are necessary, because they contain a repeating background image. Using tables, this is easy, because not supplying a width to the outer cells allows them to expand and make up the extra space:

<table width="100%">
    <tr height="400">
        <td></td>
        <td width="200"></td>
        <td width="300"></td>
        <td width="200"></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

But I can't seem to get the same effect using DIV's and CSS, except for using the display:table; properties. I'm hoping to find another way around this, since this property isn't supported in IE6 and IE7.

<div id="container">
    <div id="stretchLeft"></div>
    <div id="left"></div>
    <div id="center"></div>
    <div id="right"></div>
    <div id="stretchRight"></div>
</div>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You could do it with javascript / jQuery on load and on resize. Get the full page width. Then (full page width - left width - center width - right width)/2 That will be the width for your stretches.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting! I've never given thought to approaching layout this way. –  thereedeffect Feb 28 '12 at 16:40

If the only purpose of #stretchLeft and #stretchRight are to center the remaining three divs, then simply leave them out.

body{
   text-align:center;
}
#container{
    width:700px;
    margin:auto;
}


<body>
    <div id="container">
        <div id="stretchLeft"></div>
        <div id="left"></div>
        <div id="center"></div>
        <div id="right"></div>
        <div id="stretchRight"></div>
    </div>
</body>

Would do what you want.

If they have content, something along these lines will work, but it needs tweaked to your own personal situation: http://jsfiddle.net/YFx2m/

Also, FWIW, unless you have business reasons for supporting them, IE6 is less than 1% market share, and IE7 is under 5%.

share|improve this answer
    
I should have mentioned the "stretchLeft" and "stretchRight" DIV's contain a repeating background image as part of the page design. I'll edit my post accordingly. –  thereedeffect Feb 28 '12 at 16:41
    
If the outer cells are only there to frame the page, then it's even easier. Give the body a repeating background image, and give the #container a background color. –  Chris Sobolewski Feb 28 '12 at 16:44
    
Chris, that would be the easiest solution. I tried that originally. The only issue is that the repeating pattern ties into the images in "left" and "right". If it starts repeating in relation to the side of the document, the pattern doesn't line up. The design is www.metroaffinity.com , with the content area being the center, dark gray "brackets" being "left" and "right", and the light gray texture being "stretchLeft" and "stretchRight" –  thereedeffect Feb 28 '12 at 17:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.