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I have Date that look like String, and I want parse it.
But date can look like one of many patterns.

MM/dd/yy  

or

HH:mm  

or

MM/dd/yy HH:mm

or

MM/dd/yy HHmm   

I have code, that can parse many patterns

public DateTime parseDateTime(final String text)
   {
      if (StringUtils.isEmpty(text)) return null;
      int field = 0;
      DateTime dateTime = null;
      IllegalArgumentException exception = null;
      for (; field < FIELD_COUNT; ++field)
      {
         if (null != formatters[field])
         {
            try
            {
               dateTime = formatters[field].parseDateTime(text);
               break;
            }
            catch (final IllegalArgumentException e)
            {
               exception = null != exception ? exception : e;
            }
         }
      }
      if (dateTime == null)
      {
         throw exception;
      }
      return dateTime;
   }

formatters[] is array of

DateTimeFormatter

May you suggest a different way? More simple

share|improve this question
    
Googling tells me a library called POJava includes a heuristic date/time parser: pojava.org/site/pojava-2.8.0/apidocs/org/pojava/datetime/…. Another library that does this is Python's dateutil, but you'd obviously have to port that which might not be worth the effort. –  millimoose Feb 28 '12 at 16:26
    
Your approach is readable and maintainable. Your initialization of 'formatters' will make it clear at a glance what patterns are supported. You can add and remove patterns without changing any other code. It would be worthwhile to compare 'simpler' alternatives to what you have now. –  Andy Thomas Feb 28 '12 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The first pattern contains no space, and no colon.

The second one contains a colon, but no space.

The third one contains a space and a colon.

The last one contains a space, but no colon.

So using two indexOf() calls, you should be able to determine the pattern to apply.

Another way would be to use the length of the string, which is different in all the patterns (8, 5, 14 and 13).

share|improve this answer
    
Good idea, but not simpler. I was hoping, that joda-API has already contained method, that using many patterns. –  Ilya Feb 28 '12 at 16:36

The SimpleDateFormat class can parse dates of any string format you specify. For the format rules, see the javadoc

For example,

    try
    {
        DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yy HHmm");
        Date date = df.parse("03/29/12 2359");
        System.out.println(date);
    }
    catch (ParseException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

Because parse can ignore trailing characters if all format fields have been parsed, start with the longest/most complex one and end with the shortest/simplest one. Take the first one that doesn't throw an exception.

In your case:

{
new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yy HH:mm"),
new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yy HHmm"),
new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yy"),
new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm")
}
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