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The project below fails to run with "access violation" error. I use Delphi XE2 Update 3.

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

type
  TTestClass = class
  public
    class procedure Test;
  end;

var
  TestClass: TTestClass;

class procedure TTestClass.Test;
begin
end;

begin
  TestClass.Test;
end.

If i mark class procedure Test as "static", there is no problem. Is this 'as designed'?

P.S.: It was my mistake, shame on me.

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5  
"Shame on you"? Maybe. But at least you were humble enough to consider that it might be your mistake and not a compiler error, and ask people who know more than you do. Congrats for that; that's one of the marks of a good engineer. –  Mason Wheeler Feb 28 '12 at 17:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, what you've witnessed is correct.

Non-static class methods, just like instance methods, have a hidden Self parameter. For class methods, that refers to the class reference. It's like the compiler transforms your method into this:

type
  TTestClassClass = class of TTestClass;

procedure TTestClass_Test(Self: TTestClassClass);

When you call a class method on a non-class receiver (i.e., an object reference), the compiler inserts a call to ClassType to fill in that parameter with the run-time type of the object, like this:

TTestClass_Test(TestClass.ClassType);

The ClassType method fetches the address of the object's VMT, but your variable doesn't refer to any VMT. Your variable is either a null pointer or uninitialized, so attempting to dereference it to read the VMT address results in an access violation, if you're lucky. (If you're unlucky, it dereferences the address and the address happens to be somewhere else in your program's address space, and the result is interpreted as a VMT pointer even though it's not.)

Call class methods on class references or valid object references only.

TTestClass.Test;

When you call it on a class-reference "literal" as above, the compiler already knows the value of the first parameter and transforms the call like this:

TTestClass_Test(TTestClass);
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Sounds reasonable. TestClass is nil. You cannot invoke a non-static class method on a non-instance:

'A class method can be called through a class reference or an object reference. When it is called through an object reference, the class of the object becomes the value of Self' - no object, no class.

'class static methods can be accessed without an object reference' - doesn't matter about the TestClass instance because of the direct, static call to the class method.

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You are calling a method on a nil reference. Even class methods use the object they are called on to determine the real type of the variable at runtime. You have to do

TestClass := TTestClass.Create;

To actually create an instance of the class, then

FreeAndNil(TestClass);

To deallocate it.

If you do

TTestClass.Test;

Then the call is resolved at compile time because it doesn't depend on the type of the variable, so it works.

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Do I really need to create an instance of the class to access 'class procedure'? –  BofA Feb 28 '12 at 16:37
    
-1 what's the point of being a class procedure if you have to create an instance of the class to call it? –  ComputerSaysNo Feb 28 '12 at 16:40
    
actually, my bad, haven't read the whole code, he is declaring a variable of the type... –  ComputerSaysNo Feb 28 '12 at 16:43
    
-1. The compiler does not optimize away calls to empty methods. If it did, there wouldn't have been an access violation when calling the method. Furthermore, the question said nothing about whether this was "debug" or "release" mode. An instance is not required to call a class method. –  Rob Kennedy Feb 28 '12 at 16:47
    
@Rob I guess I misread, I thought he said it worked on release. Must have been another question. But, the compiler can choose to optimise away a call to an empty function if it can, although this does have nothing to do with this question. –  Seth Carnegie Feb 28 '12 at 16:51

The issue is that while you have a declared variable of your TTestClass, you have no instantiation. You need to call Create before you cn use the Test method, otherwise it will fail (except for your static, which does not need instantiation of the entire class). So your main code would be

begin  
  TestClass := TTestClass.Create;  
  TestClass.Test;  
  TestClass.Free;  
end.
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The following works perfectly in XE, it seems like a bug in your version of Delphi, your code is correct so long as it doesn't call a "private" variable within the class which is not an instance, but I think you've figured that out.

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils;

type
  TTest = class
  public
    class procedure test;
  end;

{ TTest }

class procedure TTest.test;
begin
  Writeln('hello');
end;

begin
  try
    TTest.test;
    Readln;
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
The OP is not using TTest.test he is calling the Test mehthod using a unitializated variable TestClass.Test –  RRUZ Feb 28 '12 at 16:48
    
This works on all Delphi versions, but then it's different from the code in the question. –  David Heffernan Feb 28 '12 at 16:48
    
@RRUz, David yes, I've read his code in "rush" and made a bad answer... I've realised after it was too late... –  ComputerSaysNo Feb 28 '12 at 17:07

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