Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have been struggling with design decision on how to store this information in tables.

I have table called property which holds the record for real estate properties.

CREATE TABLE `property` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `addDate` datetime NOT NULL,
  `serial` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `title` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  `description` text,
  `user_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `area_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `category_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE  KEY `serial` (`serial`),
  FOREIGN KEY (`user_id`) REFERENCES `user`(`id`),
  FOREIGN KEY (`area_id`) REFERENCES `area`(`id`),
  FOREIGN KEY (`category_id`) REFERENCES `category`(`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

I have to display 5 featured property and 5 hotDeal property offered by the site owner in the companies index page. i am not able to decide wether to hold the record in one single table or two different table.

for example.

CREATE TABLE `property_featured` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `addDate` datetime NOT NULL,
  `description` text DEFAULT NULL,
  `position` tinyint(1) DEFAULT '0',
  `property_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `position` (`position`,`property_id`),
  FOREIGN KEY (`property_id`) REFERENCES `property`(`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `property_hotdeal` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `addDate` datetime NOT NULL,
  `description` text DEFAULT NULL,
  `position` tinyint(1) DEFAULT '0',
  `property_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `position` (`position`,`property_id`),
  FOREIGN KEY (`property_id`) REFERENCES `property`(`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

which approach should i go with, single or split?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

All the information is exactly the same, so you should use a single table with an additional column, call it whatever you want, and make it a TINYINT (0 or 1) if there are only two possible values, or perhaps VARCHAR if there could be more values in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
In fact, two different tables would probably create extra trouble with keeping the id columns unique in both tables (which I assume you would want to do). –  Travesty3 Feb 28 '12 at 18:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.