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I'm trying to write a script that accepts input for a number, and then checks to see

(a) that the input is in fact a number, and (b) that the number in question is less than or equal to 17.

I've tried a variety of "if" statements to no avail, and now I'm trying to wrap my head around "try" statements. This is my best attempt to date:

def listlength():
    print "How many things (up to 17) do you want in the list?"
    global listlong
    listlong = raw_input("> ")
    try:
        listlong = int(listlong)
        listlong <= 17
    except:
        print "Gotta be a number less than 17, chumpy!"
        listlength()
    liststretcher()

It works for the first element in the try: if it's not a numeral, I have to run through the listlength function again. But the second element (<=17) is completely ignored.

I've also tried

try:
    listlong = int(listlong) and listlong <= 17

...but that still gives me only a functional first check, and ignores the second entirely.

I also get the same result if I have two try statements:

    try:
        listlong = int(listlong)
    except:
        print "Gotta be a number, chumpy!"
        listlength()
    try: 
        listlong <=17
    except: 
        print "Gotta be less than 17!"
        listlength()
    liststretcher() 

Is there a way to have try: check two things, and require both to pass before moving past the exception? Or do I have to make two different try: statements in the same definition before moving on to the liststretcher() command?

In response to S.Lott, below: my intention was that "try: listlong <=17" would check to see if the "listlong" variable was shorter than or equal to 17; if that check failed, it would then move to the "except"; if it passed, it would move on to liststretcher() below.

Reading the answers to date, I've got about eight things to follow up on...

share|improve this question
    
Don't use except:, rather be specific about which exceptions you want to catch. –  delnan Feb 28 '12 at 17:59
    
What did you thing listlong <= 17 was going to do? Please update the question to explain what you think that statement does. Please be specific on what that statement is supposed to do. –  S.Lott Feb 28 '12 at 18:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have most of the answer:

def isIntLessThanSeventeen(listlong):
    try:
        listlong = int(listlong) # throws exception if not an int
        if listlong >= 17:
            raise ValueError
        return True
    except:
        return False

print isIntLessThanSeventeen(16) # True
print isIntLessThanSeventeen("abc") # False
share|improve this answer

You will need to use a if statement to check the relation, raising an exception manually if appropriate.

share|improve this answer

What you're missing, and what S.Lott is trying to lead you to, is that the statement listlong <= 17 does not raise an exception. It's just a conditional expression that yields either True or False, which value you then ignore.

What you mean to say, probably, is assert( listlong <= 17 ), which throws an AssertionError exception if its condition is False.

share|improve this answer

Well, to fix your solution:

def listlength():
    print "How many things (up to 17) do you want in the list?"
    global listlong
    listlong = raw_input("> ")
    try:
        listlong = int(listlong)
        listlong <= 17
    except:
        print "Gotta be a number less than 17, chumpy!"
        listlength()
        return
    liststretcher()

The problem is that you're using a recursion when it's not needed, so try this:

def listlength():
    print "How many things (up to 17) do you want in the list?"
    global listlong
    listlong = raw_input("> ")
    value = None
    while value is None or and value > 17:
            try:
                listlong = int(listlong)
            except:
                print "Gotta be a number less than 17, chumpy!"
                value = None
    listlong = value
    liststretcher()

That way the function does not call itself and the call for liststretcher will happen only when the input was valid.

share|improve this answer
length = ""
while not length.isdigit() or int(length) > 17:
   length = raw_input("Enter the length (max 17): ")
length = int(length)
share|improve this answer

No reason to avoid recursion, this works as well:

def prompt_list_length(err=None):
    if err:
        print "ERROR: %s" % err
    print "How many things (up to 17) do you want in the list?"
    listlong = raw_input("> ")
    try:
        # See if the list can be converted to an integer,
        # Python will raise an excepton of type 'ValueError'
        # if it can't be converted.
        listlong = int(listlong)
    except ValueError:
        # Couldn't be converted to an integer.
        # Call the function recursively, include error message.
        listlong = prompt_list_length("The value provided wasn't an integer")
    except:
        # Catch any exception that isn't a ValueError... shouldn't hit this.
        # By simply telling it to 'raise', we're telling it to not handle
        # the exception and pass it along.
        raise
    if listlong > 17:
        # Again call it recursively.
        listlong = prompt_list_length("Gotta be a number less than 17, chumpy!")

    return listlong

input = prompt_list_length()
print "Final input value was: %d" % input
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