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I'm confused with this since i'm not an AS expert

while (var6 < (var5 - 1))  
{
 var8 = var3[(var6 + 1)];  
 var10 = (var7 >>> 5 ^ var8 << 2) + (var8 >>> 3 ^ var7 << 4) ^ (var13 ^ var8) + (var4[var6   & 3 ^ var11] ^ var7);  
 var var14:* = var3[var6] + var10;  
 var3[var6] = var3[var6] + var10;  
 var7 = var14;  
 var6 = var6 + 1;  
}  

What i want to know exactly is what is the meaning of these operators:

  1. >>> and ^
  2. (var8 >>> 3 ^ var7 << 4)
  3. var11 = var13 >>> 2 & 3
share|improve this question

These are all known as bitwise operators, i.e. operators that manipulate integer values by their binary representations. You can find a full reference of operators in ActionScript in Adobe's documentation.

>>> is the bitwise unsigned right shift operator; it shifts bits to the right without preserving the sign of a value.

^ is the bitwise XOR operator. It takes two operands and performs a XOR operation on their bits.

The expression (var8 >>> 3 ^ var7 << 4) means:

  1. var8 bit-shifted 3 times to the right (divided by 2^3);

  2. result bitwise XORed with var7;

  3. result bit-shifted 4 times to the left (multiplied by 2^4).

And the expression var11 = var13 >>> 2 & 3 means:

  1. var13 bit-shifted 2 times to the right (divided by 2^2);

  2. result bitwise ANDed with 3;

  3. assigned to var11.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you BoltClock for you help. I steal have a small question what is the difference between >> and >>> technically. – Zarboot Feb 28 '12 at 19:03
    
@Zarboot: >> preserves the sign; i.e. -8 >> 1 would give you -4 with the negative sign, but -8 >>> 1 would give you a different result because it doesn't preserve the sign bit (the leftmost bit). See also: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two%27s_complement – BoltClock Feb 28 '12 at 19:09
    
Thank you again – Zarboot Feb 28 '12 at 21:11
    
You can mark an answer accepted by clicking the checkmark on the left. Welcome to the site! – BoltClock Feb 29 '12 at 13:49

It's doing bitwise math http://www.moock.org/asdg/technotes/bitwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Very useful. Thanks – Zarboot Feb 28 '12 at 21:11

Looks decompiled to me... it's hard to imagine someone who can surely tell the operator precedence of & and ^ and on the other hand using i = i + 1 / untyped variables... Since there are like 15 of the variables, it feels like it's the MD5 algorithm... don't know why are you decompiling it, if that's the case...

So, you will also need this very much to understand it: operators precedense and associativity

share|improve this answer
    
indeed it is. I found this on the net, but i was wondering what is the meaning of all these operators. And yes it's part of the TEA implementation. Thanks anyway – Zarboot Feb 29 '12 at 10:52

It is part of an implementation of XXTEA.

XXTEA by definition works with unsigned integers. Hence the implementation must use unsigned right shift operators (i.e. >>> but not >>). Left shifts (<<) do not depend on whether the integesrs are signed or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes it is.Thank you – Zarboot Feb 29 '12 at 10:57

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