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What does “>” mean in CSS rules?

What does the > symbol mean in CSS? I noticed it in my Wordpress blog theme and want to know what it is doing.

#access li:hover > a,
#access ul ul :hover > a,
#access a:focus {
    background: #efefef;
}
#access li:hover > a,
#access a:focus {
    background: #f9f9f9; /* Show a solid color for older browsers */
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(#f9f9f9, #e5e5e5);
    background: -o-linear-gradient(#f9f9f9, #e5e5e5);
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, 0% 0%, 0% 100%, from(#f9f9f9), to(#e5e5e5)); /* Older webkit syntax */
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(#f9f9f9, #e5e5e5);
    color: #373737;
}
#access ul li:hover > ul {
    display: block;
}
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marked as duplicate by BoltClock Feb 28 '12 at 18:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

it means that only "first nested" elements will be targeted ("child" elements), for example

   <div id="a">
       <div id="b">
         <div id="c">
       </div>
      </div>
    </div>

if you write

#a div{
 background: red;
}

then both #b and #c will be red, but if you use > like

#a > div{
 background: red;
}

then only #b will be red, #c will not.

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That is a child selector (also called a child combinator). You can find out more about selectors on the website of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), where you can read the CSS2 entry on the child selector or you can skip straight to the CSS3 entry on the child selector.

Also, here's a great quote from another SO question about CSS Child vs Descendant selectors:

Just think of what the words "child" and "descendant" mean in English:

  • My daughter is both my child and my descendant

  • My granddaughter is not my child, but she is my descendant.

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The CSS2 selector specification has been superseded by the CSS3 spec as it's now a Recommendation (also with a pretty cool URL): w3.org/TR/selectors –  BoltClock Feb 28 '12 at 18:44
    
@BoltClock Good point. –  David Brainer-Banker Feb 28 '12 at 19:23

li > a matches any a element that is a child of li. See W3C CSS page for any selectors.

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