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I've written code which parses a file which contains MAC Addresses and Flag values to be updated in an Oracle table. However, since this process will be run on thousands of record I wish to split up the workload and update the database simultaneously. I am unsure of the best way to implement this as I am a beginner at concurrency. I've been reading up and looking at sample code, but it is still very ambiguous and unclear to me.

My first idea was to split the list into 10 segments but it became overcomplicated and convoluted with Lists of Lists and the sort...

I'm just looking for a nudge in the right direction...

Attached is my current code:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.lang.String;        
import java.sql.*;
import java.lang.Class;  
import oracle.jdbc.*;
import oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver;

public class Process{

public FlagProcess(){
    running = false;


}



public static List<String> readFile(String filename) throws IOException {
    BufferedReader macAddresses = null;
    List<String> info = new ArrayList<String>();
    try {
        macAddresses = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(filename));

        String line = null;

        while ((line = macAddresses.readLine()) != null) {
            //Process the data, here we just print it out
            System.out.println(line);
            String[] bufferArray = line.split("\\|");
            String mac = bufferArray[0];
            String value = bufferArray[1];
            System.out.println("MAC: " + mac);
            System.out.println("PPV Value: " + value);
            info.add(mac);
            info.add(value);
        }

    } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        //Close the BufferedReader
        try {
            if (macAddresses != null)
                macAddresses.close();
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    return info;
}


public static Connection getConnection() throws SQLException,ClassNotFoundException{ 
    DriverManager.registerDriver(new oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver());
    String URL = "jdbc:oracle:thin://@xxxxxxxxxx:1521:xxxxxx";
    Connection conn = DriverManager.getConnection(URL, "username", "password");
    System.out.println("Connection established...");

    return conn;
}

public static void freeConnection(Connection conn) throws SQLException {
    try {
        if (conn != null) {
            conn.setAutoCommit(true);
        }
    } finally {
        if (conn != null) {
            try {
                conn.close();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println("FlagProcess.freeConnection() - got exception while closing connection.");
                e.printStackTrace();                     
            }
        }
    }
}

public static synchronized void updateDatabase(String mac, String value, Connection conn) throws SQLException
{  

        String update = "UPDATE device set FLAG = ? where IDENTIFICATION = ?";
            System.out.println(update);
        try{
                PreparedStatement pstmt = conn.prepareStatement(update);
                pstmt.setString(1, value);
                pstmt.setString(2, mac);
                int x = pstmt.executeUpdate();
                System.out.println("Update complete.");
            }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        finally{
        freeConnection(conn);
        }   
}




public static void main(String [] args){

    PPVFlagProcess pfp = new PPVFlagProcess();
    try{ 
        List<String> info= readFile("values");
        String mac = info.get(0);
        String value = info.get(1);
        Connection conn = pfp.getConnection();
        pfp.updateDatabase(mac, value, conn);
        pfp.freeConnection(conn);

    }
    catch(Exception e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }   
}

}

Any help would be greatly appreciated, Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Your accept race does not encourage anyone to answer your questions. See here: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… –  Gray Feb 28 '12 at 18:23
    
Have you tried turning off auto-commit instead of using multiple threads? I think that will give you more bang for your buck. –  Gray Feb 28 '12 at 18:23
    
does thread is performing any additional task other than updating record in database? –  JProgrammer Feb 28 '12 at 18:25
2  
Was there a question here? –  Brian Roach Feb 28 '12 at 18:26
1  
synchronizing the updateDatabase method will defeat the entire purpose of using more than one thread and probably make the whole thing even slower. –  Affe Feb 28 '12 at 18:26
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4 Answers

This sounds like premature optimization to me. With the concurrent approach you would increase performance on the client side. But I would expect your bottleneck to be on the database side (network, database cpu, lock contention, disc io). With the concurrent approach this could even result in worse performance.

So if you want to get this stuff fast I would look into sqlldr and stuff.

And before anything: Get a simple solution working and then look for the bottleneck.

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I can't see any concurrency in your code, if you want a better performance, set batch size on your prepared statement, and execute statements once a while (for example after 20 records).

share|improve this answer
    
I have not implemented any. I am unsure of how to implement it. I've split the list of records to update into 10 different lists for threads to update. –  cbj Feb 28 '12 at 18:59
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If you worry about the performance of your code, start with getting rid of the autocommit. You explicitly set it to true (the (cruel) default). Your code will already be a lot faster by setting autocommit to false.

Next thing to do is to use bulk loading. See 23 Performance Extensions, use the Oracle way to perform batches, not the standard way. Do this and you may ask yourself: why did I do it so difficult.

In Oracle there are a few things not to do:

  1. autocommit
  2. connect/disconnect for every small element of work
  3. use dynamic (unprepared) SQL
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I think, you are slowing down the hole thing, by executing it multithreaded. Use prepared statements and a batchupdate instead.

The System.out are a bad idea, if performance is important.

share|improve this answer
    
Doing it this way doesn't speed up the process though.. It will still execute each update one a time. –  cbj Feb 28 '12 at 18:48
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