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I have one process that creates 10 sub-processes and they all share a memory segment. The 10 sub-processes can run concurrently, but I want the father to sleep during this time. When the children finish they go to sleep. When all the children are done, the father makes some calculations and wakes the children for another round (and he again goes to sleep, until all children have finished their calculations). I thought I can pause() inside a while loop that is conditioned on check_children_finished(). The children know to raise a signal to the parent via kill() and they have his pid (sent to them as an argument) and actually the father also has the children pid (stored in the shared memory) Here is some code -


Parent code:


#include <csignal>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <sys/types.h>

#include <sys/ipc.h> 
#include <sys/shm.h> 
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

static void sig_usr(int);
static volatile sig_atomic_t *sharedArray;
static int segmentId; 
int number_of_children = 10;

bool check_children_finished(){
  for (int i=1; i<number_of_children; i++)
    if (sharedArray[i*2] == -1)
      return false;
  return true;
}

void sig_usr (int signo)
{
  /*
  // This is signals handler (when a signal fires this is what runs)
  // we expect SIGUSR1 from the child process
  if(signo == SIGUSR1)
    cout << "(parent: " << (int)getpid() << ") --- caught SIGUSR1" << endl;
  if (signo == SIGUSR2){
    cout << "(parent: " << (int)getpid() << ") --- caught SIGUSR2" << endl;
  }else
    perror("unexpected signal fired");
  //  return;
  */
}


int main()
{

  // size of the shared memory array
  int arrSize = 100;
  const int shareSize = sizeof(sig_atomic_t) * (arrSize);
  /* Allocate shared memory segment */  
  segmentId = shmget(IPC_PRIVATE, shareSize, S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR); 
  sharedArray = (sig_atomic_t *) shmat(segmentId, NULL, 0);

  // feel shared memory with -1
  for (int i=0; i<arrSize; i++)
    sharedArray[i] = -1;

  // binding SIGUSR1 & SIGUSR2 to sig_usr method
  // we need to override SIGUSR2 because of group signaling
  signal(SIGUSR1, sig_usr);
  //  signal(SIGUSR2,sig_usr);

  fprintf(stderr, "\n (parnet) myPid=%d ; segId=%d\n",(int)getpid(), segmentId);
  sharedArray[0] = 123;
  int kids = 0; // this is the number of child processes
  // we send to the child (as shell parameters) the parent pid, shared segment address , and index to the shared memory(this is where he will write his pid and in index+1 the heuristic value)
  char* kidsParams[5];

  // takes care of param[0]=command to run
  string exec_line = "./child";
  kidsParams[0] = new char[exec_line.size()+1];
  memcpy(kidsParams[0], exec_line.c_str(), exec_line.size());

  // takes care of param[1]=parent pid
  kidsParams[1] = new char[100]; // = malloc(100*sizeof(char));
  sprintf( kidsParams[1],"%d",(int)getpid());

  // takes care of param[2]=shared mem segment address
  kidsParams[2] = new char[100];
  sprintf( kidsParams[2],"%d",segmentId);

  // takes care of param[3]=the child private index in shared mem
  kidsParams[3] = new char[100];

  kidsParams[4] = NULL;  // needed as end of array
  int index = 0;
  for(; kids<number_of_children; kids++) {
    sprintf( kidsParams[3],"%d",index);
    index+=2;
    pid_t childpid = fork();
    if(childpid==0){
      execv(kidsParams[0],kidsParams);
    }
   }
  cout << "(parent) --- just finished creating " << number_of_children << " kids" << endl;
  cout << "(parent) entering to while {...} pause" << endl;
  for (int i=0; i<number_of_children; i++)
    cout << "[" << i << "] = " << sharedArray[i];
  cout << endl;
  // going to sleep --- here I want while loop with conditioning that all children finished
  while ( ! check_children_finished() ) {
    cout << "(parent) now will signal the group" << endl;
    // killpg sends signal to the group (all the children). note that the group has the same pid as the father
    killpg(getpid(),SIGUSR2);
    cout << "(parent) just finished signaling the group" << endl;
    pause();
    for (int i=0; i<number_of_children; i++)
       cout << "[" << i << "] = " << sharedArray[i];
    cout << endl;
  }
  cout << "(parent) exited the while{...} paused" << endl;


  // removes shared memory
  //  shmdt (sharedArray);  
  //  shmctl (segmentId, IPC_RMID, NULL);  
  // note that all children must also shmctl (...IPC_RMID...);

}

Here is a child code :


(same includes...)
using namespace std;

// declare the function proptotype (needed in signal function)
static void sig_usr(int);

// handles the signal (what happens when the signal fires) --- here I want to solve the search problem
void sig_usr (int signo)
{
  /*
  if(signo == SIGUSR1){
    cout << "(child: " << (int)getpid() << ") --- caught SIGUSR1" << endl;
  }else if(signo == SIGUSR2){
    cout << "(child: " << (int)getpid() << ") --- caught SIGUSR2" << endl;
  }else
    perror("eerrrr");
  //  return;
  */

}

int main(int argc, char** argv){
  // binding the signal to the handler
  signal(SIGUSR2,sig_usr);
  int segmentId;  
  volatile sig_atomic_t *sharedArray ;
  int myIndex;
  int myData =  5; 
  int parentPid;
  // read parameters
  parentPid = atoi(argv[1]);
  segmentId = atoi(argv[2]);
  myIndex = atoi(argv[3]);

  // declare a pointer to the shared memory
  sharedArray = (sig_atomic_t *) shmat(segmentId, NULL, 0);
  sharedArray[myIndex] =(int)getpid();
  sharedArray[myIndex+1] = myData;
  //  fprintf(stderr, "My Group Pid(child): %d\n",(int)getpgrp());
  cout << "(child: " << (int)getpid() << ") --- going to sleep" << endl;
  pause();
  cout << "(child: " << (int)getpid() << ") --- I woke up" << endl;
  //calc data

  //fprintf(stderr, "My Pid(child): %d\n",(int)getpid());
  //fprintf(stderr, "I got %d (child)\n",sharedArray[0] );


  // this signals the father
  kill(parentPid,SIGUSR1);
  cout << "fired SIGUSR1"<< endl;
}

Here is a typical output:


 (parnet) myPid=3104 ; segId=22872080
(parent) --- just finished creating 10 kids
(parent) entering to while {...} pause
[0] = 123[1] = -1[2] = -1[3] = -1[4] = -1[5] = -1[6] = -1[7] = -1[8] = -1[9] = -1
(parent) now will signal the group
User defined signal 2

Sometimes I get something like:


 (parnet) myPid=3126 ; segId=22937618
(child: 3129) --- going to sleep
(child: 3127) --- going to sleep
(parent) --- just finished creating 10 kids
(parent) entering to while {...} pause
[0] = 3127[1] = 5[2] = 3128[3] = 5[4] = 3129[5] = 5[6] = -1[7] = -1[8] = -1[9] = -1
(parent) now will signal the group
User defined signal 2
(child: 3127) --- I woke up
fired SIGUSR1
(child: 3128) --- going to sleep
(child: 3132) --- going to sleep
(child: 3129) --- I woke up
fired SIGUSR1

Can anyone suggest a solution? Thanks! -- Liron

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3 Answers 3

I would suggest to use pipes between the monitor process and the other worker processes, with a simple textual protocol for control communication.

(because textual protocol on pipes is more reliable than signals - which can be "lost" or "merged")

So, before forking the workers, I would call (e.g. 10 times, or perhaps 2*10 times if you want them both ways) pipe(2) to create control communication. Then you could use ppoll(2) (or just poll) to multiplex the pipes.

But did you consider using existing frameworks, like e.g. Open-MPI (an implementation of MPI = "Message Passing Interface"). This don't mean to give up using a shared memory segment (just use MPI for control and synchronization issues). Or perhaps using OpenMP or just p-threads?

MPI is very used in high-performance numerical computing, and many super-computers have it (using specialized hardware for very fast message passing).

(Of course, super-computers are clusters, so you don't really have shared memory between thousands of cores; you'll take advantage of them by using only MPI in your code...)

(You might also investigate using GPGPU thru OpenCL)

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Basile & Thanks for your quick reply! I will definitely take a look at MPI. Regarding pipe --- is this a blocking command? is there significant performance difference between communicating via pipes vs. shared memory? –  Liron Cohen Feb 28 '12 at 19:25
    
pipe is a system call, not a command. And it runs quite quickly, and you should use it before forking, at early initialization. I was suggesting to use it for "control" communication, keeping your shared memory (for common shared data) as you did before. Then use poll to multiplex without blocking. –  Basile Starynkevitch Feb 28 '12 at 20:49

The usual way of synchronising processes is to use semaphores.

The more complicated semaphore operations are supplied by SysV using semctl(),semop() and semget(). POSIX semaphores (which are simpler) use sem_open(), sem_close(), sem_post() and sem_wait().

Whichever you use create the semaphore in the main process before starting any children and delete the semaphore after all children have been reaped when exiting the main process.

Each of the children should execute a sem_open() (without O_CREAT) on the semaphore and then a sem_wait() where they will block providing that you have initialised the semaphore correctly. When the sem_wait() returns execute the code that touches the shared memory and then call a sem_post(). This should give exclusive shared access to your shared memory segment.

Using signals seems like a bad idea. I have certainly never heard of doing it that way.

In my own experience I had a separate process that created all SysV semaphores and copied the semaphore ids into a suitable location in the shared memory segment. This is all the process did and then it exited. The semaphores are persistent - I would then start other processes from the command line that would open the semaphore (without O_CREAT) and do a sem_wait(). So I was not using fork/exec to start child processes. Separate processes from the command line seemed simpler.

I am unsure whether process children inherit semaphore ids like inheriting file descriptors

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your helpful comments! Below is a revised version (based on what you suggested). –  Liron Cohen Feb 29 '12 at 11:29

Indeed using semaphores makes things a bit simpler and finally working. Note that know you have to compile with -pthread flag (e.g. g++ -Wall -pthread chikd.c -o parent). I do have a small issue though, does anyone know if I can do something better then sleep(1)? (parent code, line 109).

Parent code:

#include <csignal>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/ipc.h> 
#include <sys/shm.h> 
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <semaphore.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

using namespace std;

char SEM_NAME[] = "lir";

static void sig_usr(int);
static sig_atomic_t *sharedArray; // static volatile sig_atomic_t *sharedArray;
static int segmentId; 

int number_of_children = 10;
int child_init_ctrl = 0;
int child_finish_ctrl = 1;
int number_of_children_ctrl = 2;
int indexes_start_ctrl = 3;
// each child has its own : PID,DATA,ADDRESS_TO_HIS_INIT_STATE
int data_start = indexes_start_ctrl + number_of_children*3;

int getMyStartIndex(){
  return -1;
}

void sig_usr (int signo) {}

int main() {

  // create&init *new* semaphore
  sem_t *mutex;
  mutex = sem_open (SEM_NAME,O_CREAT,0644,1);
  if(mutex == SEM_FAILED) {
    perror("unable to create semaphore");
    sem_unlink(SEM_NAME);
    exit(-1);
  }

  // size of the shared memory array
  int arrSize = 100;
  const int shareSize = sizeof(sig_atomic_t) * (arrSize);
  /* Allocate shared memory segment */  
  segmentId = shmget(IPC_PRIVATE, shareSize, S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR); 
  sharedArray = (sig_atomic_t *) shmat(segmentId, NULL, 0);

  // fill shared memory with -1
  for (int i=0; i<arrSize; i++)
    sharedArray[i] = -1;

  // binding SIGUSR1 & SIGUSR2 to sig_usr method
  // we need to override SIGUSR2 because of group signaling
  signal(SIGUSR1, sig_usr);
  signal(SIGUSR2,sig_usr);

  sem_wait(mutex);
  sharedArray[child_init_ctrl] = 0;
  sharedArray[child_finish_ctrl] = 0;
  sharedArray[number_of_children_ctrl] = number_of_children;
  sem_post(mutex);

  // we send to the child (as shell parameters) the parent pid, shared segment address , and index to the shared memory(this is where he will write his pid and in index+1 the     heuristic value)
  char* kidsParams[6];

  // takes care of param[0]=command to run
  string exec_line = "./child";
  kidsParams[0] = new char[exec_line.size()+1];
  memcpy(kidsParams[0], exec_line.c_str(), exec_line.size());

  // takes care of param[1]=parent pid
  kidsParams[1] = new char[100]; // = malloc(100*sizeof(char));
  sprintf( kidsParams[1],"%d",(int)getpid());

  // takes care of param[2]=shared mem segment address
  kidsParams[2] = new char[100];
  sprintf( kidsParams[2],"%d",segmentId);

  // takes care of param[3]=the child private index in shared mem
  kidsParams[3] = new char[100];

  // takes care of param[4]=the child's first index of start state
  kidsParams[4] = new char[100]; // = malloc(100*sizeof(char));
  sprintf( kidsParams[4],"%d",getMyStartIndex());

  kidsParams[5] = NULL;  // needed as end of array

  // creates the child processes (and update child private index)
  int index = 3;
  for(int kids=0; kids<number_of_children; kids++) {
    sprintf( kidsParams[3],"%d",index);
    index+=3;
    pid_t childpid = fork();
    if(childpid==0){
      execv(kidsParams[0],kidsParams);
    }
  }

  while ( sharedArray[child_init_ctrl] != number_of_children ) {
    // waiting on the CPU !!! or going to sleep. is there a better solution?
    sleep(1);
  }

  // killpg sends signal to the group (all the children). note that the group has the same     pid as the father
  killpg (getpid(),SIGUSR2);

  // going to sleep --- here I want while loop with conditioning that all children finished
  bool all_child_finished_flag = false;
  while ( all_child_finished_flag == false ) {
    sem_wait(mutex);
    if (sharedArray[child_finish_ctrl] == number_of_children)
      all_child_finished_flag = true;
    sem_post(mutex);
    if (all_child_finished_flag == false)
      pause();
  }   


  // removes shared memory and delete semaphore
  shmdt (sharedArray);  
  shmctl (segmentId, IPC_RMID, NULL);  
  // note that all children must also shmctl (...IPC_RMID...);
  // removes the mutex
  sem_close(mutex);
  sem_unlink(SEM_NAME);

}

Child code:

// declare the function proptotype (needed in signal function)
static void sig_usr(int);
int child_init_ctrl = 0;
int child_finish_ctrl = 1;
int number_of_children_ctrl = 2;
int number_of_children=0;

// handles the signal (what happens when the signal fires)
void sig_usr (int signo) {}

char SEM_NAME[] = "lir";

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    (same includes...)

      // create&init *existing* semaphore
      sem_t *mutex;
      mutex = sem_open (SEM_NAME, 0, 0644, 0);
      if(mutex == SEM_FAILED) {
        perror("reader:unable to execute semaphore");
        sem_close(mutex);
        exit(-1);
      }

      // binding the signal to the handler
      signal(SIGUSR2,sig_usr);

      volatile sig_atomic_t *sharedArray ;
      int myData=0;
      // read parameters
      int parentPid = atoi(argv[1]);
      int segmentId = atoi(argv[2]);
      int myIndex = atoi(argv[3]);
      int myStartState = atoi(argv[4]);

      // declare a pointer to the shared memory
      sharedArray = (sig_atomic_t *) shmat(segmentId, NULL, 0);
      sharedArray[myIndex] =(int)getpid();
      sharedArray[myIndex+1] = myData;
      number_of_children = sharedArray[number_of_children_ctrl];

      sem_wait(mutex);
      sharedArray[child_init_ctrl]++;
      sem_post(mutex);

      pause();

      // do some "calculations"
      sharedArray[myIndex+1] = myIndex;
      for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
        sharedArray[myIndex+1] += i;

      // this signals the father
      bool should_i_fire = false;
      sem_wait(mutex);
      sharedArray[child_finish_ctrl]++;
      if (sharedArray[child_finish_ctrl] == number_of_children)
        should_i_fire = true;
      sem_post(mutex);
      if (should_i_fire == true)
        kill(parentPid,SIGUSR1);
    }

Best, -- Liron

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