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Consider the following (simplyfied) table:

ID           NUMBER
PROD_NO      VARCHAR2(10)
START_TIME   DATE

What I want to do is selecting a 'window' of rows of size n around a given START_TIME.

Example:

ID   PROD_NO   START_TIME
...
42   1234567   2012-02-28 13:42:10
43   1234568   2012-02-28 13:47:53
44   1234569   2012-02-28 13:52:22
45   1234570   2012-02-28 13:59:01
46   1234571   2012-02-28 14:02:12
47   1234572   2012-02-28 14:05:19
... 

Provided START_TIME = '2012-02-28 14:00:00' and window size n = 4 the resulting set of rows should be ID 44...47.

The entries cannot be assumed to be sorted by START_TIME. In case there are not enough entries available to match the specified window size, it may be cropped.

Since my SQL skills are pretty limited any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

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Selecting ranges of records can be complicated in Oracle, but I'm working on a solution.... –  BD. Feb 28 '12 at 20:34
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use analytic functions to help with this:

select WT.ID
  from (select WT.ID
              ,max(
                 START_TIME)
               over (order by START_TIME
                     rows between 2 preceding and 2 following)
                 as MAXST
              ,min(
                 START_TIME)
               over (order by START_TIME
                     rows between 2 preceding and 2 following)
                 as MINST
          from WT) WT
 where MINST < to_date('2012-02-28 14:00:00', 'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss')
       and MAXST > to_date('2012-02-28 14:00:00', 'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss')
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Looks great. Can you estimate how efficient your solution is compared to the UNION based one, regarding runtime and memory usage? The real table may contain up to 10.000 entries, with a dozen colums to select from every few seconds. –  raines Feb 29 '12 at 7:47
    
I'd guess this is way more efficient (as my solution requires two passes over your table). You should try both and post your findings. –  BD. Feb 29 '12 at 13:33
    
Theoretically mine should be faster for the reason BD gave. But for 10,000 entries there probably won't be any noticeable difference. I would recommend an index on the START_TIME however and then test both out over several iterations. –  John Doyle Feb 29 '12 at 23:36
    
Ok, thank you very much for the help! –  raines Mar 1 '12 at 6:35
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This should work now:

SELECT *
FROM   (SELECT id, 
               prod_no, 
               start_time, 
               ROWNUM rn,
               datediff
        FROM   (SELECT   id,
                         prod_no,
                         start_time,
                         start_time
                         - TO_DATE('01-JAN-2011 12:00:00',
                                   'DD-MON-YYYY HH:MI:SS AM')
                            datediff
                FROM     table
                WHERE    start_time
                         - TO_DATE('01-JAN-2011 12:00:00',
                                   'DD-MON-YYYY HH:MI:SS AM') > 0
                ORDER BY datediff))
WHERE  rn <= 2
UNION ALL
SELECT *
FROM   (SELECT id, 
               prod_no, 
               start_time, 
               ROWNUM rn,
               datediff
        FROM   (SELECT   id,
                         prod_no,
                         start_time,
                         start_time
                         - TO_DATE('01-JAN-2011 12:00:00',
                                   'DD-MON-YYYY HH:MI:SS AM')
                            datediff
                FROM     table
                WHERE    start_time
                         - TO_DATE('01-JAN-2011 12:00:00',
                                   'DD-MON-YYYY HH:MI:SS AM') <= 0
                ORDER BY datediff DESC))
WHERE  rn <= 2
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What is the meaning of 'rownum rn' is this some kind of temporary variable? –  raines Feb 28 '12 at 20:45
    
rownum is an oracle pseudocolumn, it assigns 1..n to the result set, that's why there is an ORDER BY clause there. And "rn" is just an alias for the rownum column. –  BD. Feb 28 '12 at 20:46
    
If you're working with a large dataset, this solution would not perform well, but not sure of your alternatives... –  BD. Feb 28 '12 at 20:49
    
Am I mistaken, or will this solution return the n entries which are the closest to the specified START_TIME regardless of START_TIME is located in the center of the window? The intention is to get a symetrical window of START_TIME + n/2 to START_TIME - n/2 entries –  raines Feb 28 '12 at 20:52
    
OK, try this, it worked in my testing. I had to move the ROWNUM up into another SELECT. I understand what you're looking for. Try running the inner queries alone first, that should help you understand what I've done. –  BD. Feb 28 '12 at 20:59
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