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When making the prototypal inheritance, it's asked to refer the child's constructor back to itself below,

A = function() {} 
B = function() {} 
B.prototype = new A;
B.prototype.constructor = B;

What would take adverse effect if not?

EDIT

  • As @GGG & @CMS have explained, the constructor alignment takes no effect on creating the child object by new Child(...), but is necessary to correctly reflect the child object's constructor later.
  • @GGG has also suggested a defensive alternative to extend the prototype chain. While Child.prototype = new Parent(...) includes parent's properties to child, Child.prototype = Object.create(Parent.prototype) doesn't.
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, please don't do this:

B.prototype = new A;

Do this instead (shim Object.create for old browsers):

B.prototype = Object.create(A.prototype);

As for constructor, nothing will break if you don't do this, but if you don't:

A = function() {};
var a = new A();
console.log(a.constructor); // A

B = function() {};
var b = new B();
console.log(b.constructor); // A (!)

...setting the constructor property of the prototype back to the actual constructor function allows you to do this:

B.prototype.constructor = B;
var b = new B();
console.log(b.constructor); // B
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Setting the constructor to B will use the function body of B when calling new B(), otherwise it will use the function body of A

A = function() {console.log('a')} 
B = function() {console.log('b')} 
B.prototype = new A;
B.prototype.constructor = B;

new B(); //will log "b"

A = function() {console.log('a')} 
B = function() {console.log('b')} 
B.prototype = new A;

new B(); //will log "a"
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Andreas, this is not correct. Setting the constructor of B does not change what code is executed when using new B(). The constructor is a property of B.prototype and only exists so instances of B can refer to the function that constructed them. – toc777 Jul 28 '14 at 19:40

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