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I have a project that is like an IPOD playlist . Im having trouble reading my data in a struct array without using vectors. My BF says my professor is wrong for making us not use vectors, but that is the rule. Do you guys have any suggestions? My code is below.. my professor said I was close but its still not compiling? Thanks for any help :)

Struct Songs{
string title;    
string artist;
int mem;         //size of file in MBs
}song[20];      //up to 20 possible songs

int main
{
  song * pointer = new song;
  int num = 0;

  ifstream fin;
  fin.open("input.txt")

  while (fin.good())
  {
    getline(fin, *pointer[num].title; 

    if (*pointer[num].title.empty())   //to skip blank lines
    continue;

    getline(fin, *pointer[num].artist;
    fin >> *pointer[num].mem.get();    //get to avoid whitespace/enter 

    num++;
  }

  for (int i = 0; i<num;i++)    // my test to see if it reads in properly
  { 
    cout << *pointer[num].title << endl;      
    cout << *pointer[num].artist << endl; 
    cout << *pointer[num].mem << endl;
  }
  fin.close();

  delete pointer [] ;

  return 0;
}
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Compiler errors are good to show. Anyways, from looking at it, you're trying to point to song, not Songs. The syntax of te first line should be Songs * pointer = new Songs; for a new object created dynamically, or Songs * pointer = song; for a pointer to your premade object. Also, when deleting the pointer, for just a pointer to a memory location, as in int * intPtr = &somePreviousVariable;, use delete. For a pointer containing an array created by new, as in int * intPtr = new int [20];, use delete []. In your case, pointer is pointing to a premade array. –  chris Feb 28 '12 at 21:18
    
thanks i will change that –  gamergirl22 Feb 28 '12 at 21:20
1  
Your code is riddled with simple errors. You need to fix them yourself using the errors the compiler is very helpfully giving you. We're not here to do your homework for you. –  spencercw Feb 28 '12 at 21:21
    
I added something about delete into my first post. It's important you use the right one when freeing dynamically-allocated memory. –  chris Feb 28 '12 at 21:22
    
It might be better to start with something simpler, and as always in the company of a good book. –  Kerrek SB Feb 28 '12 at 21:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Maybe he wants you to use a queue instead? As the songs could be 'queued' in a playlist that may be a more befitting data structure?

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5  
Not really an answer - should probably just be a comment –  Paul R Feb 28 '12 at 21:20

I may have missed some but I believe I marked all the changes I made to fix this. Lots of syntax errors that I placed a // Fixed next to. Also mainly I changed the allocation to new Songs[20], so you are allocating enough space for 20 new songs.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

struct Songs{  // Fixed - You had an uppercase S on 'struct'
    string title;    
    string artist;
    int mem;         //size of file in MBs
}; // fixed - Removed since we will be allocating in Main()   

int main() // fixed - you are missing () at the end of main
{

    Songs * pointer = new Songs[20]; //up to 20 possible songs  // Fixed - You allocate 20 new Songs here
    int num = 0;

    ifstream fin;
    fin.open("input.txt");

    while (fin.good())
    {
            // Fixed - all uses of pointer as an array don't need to be de-referenced with *, [num] will do it
        getline(fin, pointer[num].title); // Fixed - you were missing the functions closing )

        if (pointer[num].title.empty())   //to skip blank lines
            continue;

        getline(fin, pointer[num].artist);  // Fixed - you were missing the functions closing )
        fin >> pointer[num].mem;    //get to avoid whitespace/enter // Fixed - removed .get()

        num++;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i<num;i++)    // my test to see if it reads in properly
    { 
        cout << pointer[num].title << endl;      
        cout << pointer[num].artist << endl; 
        cout << pointer[num].mem << endl;
    }
    fin.close();

    delete [] pointer;

  return 0;
}
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