Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently starting using LESS CSS - it's awesome (I recommend you check it out if you haven't yet).

I'm working on a project, where I would like to do the following (It's not proper syntax, it's only to try and explain my problem):

if(lightness(@background_color) <= 50%)
{
    @secondary_color = #fff;
}
else
{
    @secondary_color = #000;
}

I know that I can use mixins for this, but the above method would save me from having to write a mixins everytime I need to change a color based on the @background_color variable (since I will be using @secondary_color for borders, background colors, etc).

I've been trying to find a solution, but I've had no luck. If anybody has any idea's on what I can do to make this work, I'd love to hear them.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Take a look at the section on pattern matching and guard expressions –  awfullyjohn Feb 28 '12 at 21:31
    
Thanks for the response. The only problem with that is that I'm limited to one CSS property per "guard". I'll be using @secondary_color for borders, font-colors, backgrounds, etc. If I went this route, I would need to set a guard/mixin up for each propery (background-color, color, border-color, etc) because I won't necessarily be setting each of those properties at the same time (ex. on one element, I only want to change the text color, but on another I only want to set the border color). Thats what I'm trying to avoid, if at all possible. –  N. LeBlanc Feb 28 '12 at 23:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

UPDATE I just reread your comment and understand the problem better. This should work:

.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) >= 50%) and (@prop = color){
  color: black;
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) >= 50%) and (@prop = background){
  background-color: black;
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) >= 50%) and (@prop = border){
  border-color: black;
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) >= 50%) and (@prop = all){
  color: black;
  background-color: black;      
  border-color: black;
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) < 50%) and (@prop = color){
  color: white
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) < 50%) and (@prop = background){
  background-color: white;
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) < 50%) and (@prop = border){
  border-color: white;
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) < 50%) and (@prop = all){
  color: white;
  background-color: white;      
  border-color: white;
}

Then use the mixin:

.class1 {
  .secColor (#fff, color) //should only set the color property for class1
}

.class2 {
  .secColor (#000, all) //should set all three properties for class2
}

ADDED MORE COMPACT VERSION

.propSwitch (@prop, @clr) when (@prop = color) {
  color: @clr;
}
.propSwitch (@prop, @clr) when (@prop = background) {
  background-color: @clr;
}
.propSwitch (@prop, @clr) when (@prop = border) {
  border-color: @clr;
}
.propSwitch (@prop, @clr) when (@prop = all) {
  color: @clr;
  background-color: @clr;      
  border-color: @clr;
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) >= 50%) {
  .propSwitch (@prop, #000);
}
.secColor (@bgc, @prop) when (lightness(@bgc) < 50%) {
  .propSwitch (@prop, #fff);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great solution, I did not think of that. Thanks for the answer Scott! –  N. LeBlanc Feb 29 '12 at 2:01
    
@N.LeBlanc--glad you liked it. I just updated with what I believe is a more compact way to write it. –  ScottS Feb 29 '12 at 2:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.