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i found out, that you can do modulo using this :

x % m == (x + x / m) & m

but i cannot understand why its working...

like for 8 % 7 == (8 + 8 / 7) & 7, this is

x = 8 =          0001 0000
x / 7 = 1 =      1000 0000
x + x / 7 = 9 =  1001 0000
9 & 7 =          1001 0000 & 1110 0000 = 1000 0000 = 1
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Your bits are backwards. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 28 '12 at 21:32
1  
I don't understand, isn't your example already showing how it's working? –  MysticXG Feb 28 '12 at 21:35
1  
maybe SO is BigEndian? –  user unknown Feb 28 '12 at 21:35
    
sory, i reversed the bit order (i used another custom:)... i see it working, but i dont understand why –  Peter Lapisu Feb 28 '12 at 21:37
    
So you're asking for a mathematical proof? –  MysticXG Feb 28 '12 at 21:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
N = 7k + m, m<7
N/7 = k
N + N/7 = 8k + m
(N + N/7) & 7 = (8k + m) & 7
              = m & 7
              = m

It works for any 2n-1 number, not just 7.

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how did (8k + m) & 7 became m & 7, and how did m & 7 became m ? –  Peter Lapisu Feb 28 '12 at 21:50
    
I think it's because 7 is just 0111, so if you & with any bits higher than those, it'd just become 0 anyway –  MysticXG Feb 28 '12 at 21:55
    
@PeterLapisu, @MysticXG, yes, 8k ends in 000, and m<8 so m will be entirely in the last three bits, so (8k+m)&7 = m&7. And since 7 is 111 and m is in the last three bits, m&7 = m. –  Beta Feb 28 '12 at 22:01

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