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I'm trying to have logical separators keeping all my properties logically separate, but so I only have to pass around a single object. What I'm saying is, I want to instantiate Object, and be able to use Object.InnerObject.InnerObjectsProperty. Here's the code I'm testing to try to figure out how to do this:

   namespace SubclassTesting
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int x;
            Console.WriteLine("type a number");
            x = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

            OuterClass TestClass = new OuterClass();

            TestClass.OuterNumber = x;
            TestClass.InnerClass.InnerNumber = x;
            Console.WriteLine("success!");
            Console.ReadKey();

        }
    }

    class OuterClass
    {
        public OuterClass()
        {
            _InnerClass InnerClass = new _InnerClass();
        }

        public int OuterNumber { get; set; }

        public class _InnerClass
        {
            public int InnerNumber { get; set; }
        }

        public _InnerClass InnerClass { get; set; }

    }

}

this code fails on TestClass.InnerClass.InnerNumber = x; with a NullReferenceException - Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

The constructor does nothing, it seems, and it fails to work both with and without.

Is this even possible? I want to instantiate the single OuterClass object, and have all the contained objects instantiate, and be accessible through the OuterClass object. This way I only have to pass a single object to and from methods, but can keep the inner workings logically separate from each other.

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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
public OuterClass()
{
    _InnerClass InnerClass = new _InnerClass();
}

You are creating a local variable InnerClass in your constructor - that won't help you - you need the property:

InnerClass = new _InnerClass();

I question the whole approach though. In general I don't see what nested classes buy you here and in general I would try to avoid them since they add complexity.

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+1 for noting the unnecessary inner class - the OP might not have realized that you don't need to define the class as an inner class in order to have a member variable of that type. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Feb 28 '12 at 22:15
    
Yeah I realize the nested classes are not a good practice, but in the actual application I'm developing, they seem to make good sense. It's adding a functionality to an IT ticketing system. The outer class holds all the information about the ticket's request, and the inner classes contain the information about the related users (their username, email, phone, etc). Instead of cramming 30 members into the outer class, I keep all the unique information in the outer class, and use several inner User objects. I can then pass a single object to my methods, and get returned a single object. –  friggle Feb 29 '12 at 13:21
    
Why wouldn't you have the related class instances exposed as properties of the outer class instead? No need to use inner classes to achieve the same - use composition. –  BrokenGlass Feb 29 '12 at 13:24
    
@friggle: I agree that having such a distinction between tickets and users is a good idea; I just think you have misunderstood the term "inner class". It refers specifically to a class that is defined inside another class. However, you may very well use a class in another class and still having both classes defined separately. Try moving just public class _InnerClass { public int InnerNumber { get; set; } } to the outside of OuterClass, and everything will work as before. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Feb 29 '12 at 14:21
    
^^^ can you rewrite my whole class definition to match what you are saying, Aasmund? I'm trying what I think you're saying and it's not working. I think I don't understand exactly what you mean. –  friggle Feb 29 '12 at 23:19
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_InnerClass InnerClass = new _InnerClass();

declares a local variable inside the constructor; it will be discarded immediately after the constructor has completed. If you do

InnerClass = new _InnerClass();

instead, you will actually set the member variable in the new instance of the outer class.

By the way, I strongly suggest that you call the inner class InnerClass and the variable _innerClass, since this adheres to the C# naming conventions; your current naming is bound to confuse most people.

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Thank you so much! This is my first time posting to StackOverflow, and you folks are above and beyond helpful! –  friggle Feb 29 '12 at 13:15
    
@friggle: Glad to hear it; that's what this site is for. Polite questions that clearly show what the problem is and that you have tried solving it yourself are generally rewarded with answers. :-) –  Aasmund Eldhuset Feb 29 '12 at 14:40
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You declare a new variable _InnerClass InnerClass in the constructor. Remove _InnerClass and it will start working :-)

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I think that if you change yout OuterClass ctor to

   public OuterClass()
   {
       _InnerClass = new _InnerClass();
   }

it will work much better!

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Your constructor local variable that holds the InnerClass, then dumps it. Change it to:

public OuterClass() 
{ 
    this.InnerClass = new _InnerClass(); 
} 
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You need to make a public instance of InnerClass

  class OuterClass
    {
        public _InnerClass InnerClass;
        public OuterClass()
        {
            InnerClass = new _InnerClass();
        }

        public int OuterNumber { get; set; }

        public class _InnerClass
        {
            public int InnerNumber { get; set; }
        }

        public _InnerClass InnerClass { get; set; }

    }
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