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I have this code:

int main()
{
    unsigned char c;
    enum state_t {
        state1,
        state2,
        state3
    } states;
    enum state_t (*action[3])(char c);

    state=state1;
    initialize_state(action);
}

void initialize_state (enum state_t  (*action[])(char c))
{
    action[state1]=func1;
    action[state2]=func2;
    action[state3]=func3;
}

I get a segmentation fault at initialize_state(action);.

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closed as too localized by Lightness Races in Orbit, brian d foy, Jarrod Roberson, ElYusubov, Eric J. Jan 15 '13 at 2:47

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1  
I don't think state_t can be a local type if you want to have a function return it. Try making it global. –  Kerrek SB Feb 28 '12 at 22:19
1  
See sscce.org. –  ruakh Feb 28 '12 at 22:21
1  
In fact, as it stands, this doesn't even compile. Please post a proper, well tested piece of code that accurately represents your problem. –  Kerrek SB Feb 28 '12 at 22:21
    
state is a typo, should read states I guess –  ouah Feb 28 '12 at 22:23
    
Cool story, bro... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 14 '13 at 20:38
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2 Answers

Since a segfault implies an illegal reference to memory, check to make sure that you're not passing an invalid function pointer address.

Have you run your code through a debugger to figure out exactly where the segfault lies? If not, I suggest you do so. Your code fragment doesn't compile as-is.

http://www.newty.de/fpt/fpt.html#arrays <-- using arrays of function pointers.

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Apart from your code being a total mess, e.g. no prototype declaration and having the function declared below main, or not having a return type in int main(void) , missing void in main()...etc, I guess that you probably have declared the return types of func1, func2, func3 also erroneously. e.g. void func1(void){} .

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