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A piece of my page has ~9000 elements in it and it has to be rebuilt often, which can take a few seconds.

So, I made a little overlay widget that covers the element with a Loading... message. Right before I rebuild the element, I call showOverlay(), and after the loop I call hideOverlay().

But the loop locks up the page before my Loading... message is displayed, and so it never appears.

function rebuild() {
  showOverlay();    // The overlay never appears...
  for (var i=0;i<9000;i++) {
    // append element...
  }
  hideOverlay();
}

How can I wait for the overlay to be rendered BEFORE I start the loop?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
function do_rebuild() {
  for (var i=0;i<9000;i++) {
    // append element...
  }
  hideOverlay();
}


function rebuild() {
  showOverlay();    // The overlay will appear
  window.setTimeout('do_rebuild();',1);
}

Is the only cross-browser way I know of.

share|improve this answer
    
Is 1 millisecond guaranteed to be enough? –  Tony R Feb 28 '12 at 22:32
    
@TonyR It shouldn't take very long but I would set it at 10. IIRC Google Chrome will only use a minimum of 10 anyway so if you have it at 1ms it will still wait. 10ms. This will still freeze the page though. –  James Hay Feb 28 '12 at 22:36
    
It doesn't matter how long it takes - 1ms may be enough or not. Important part is to force something analogous to a "thread switch" (even if it is not a thread switch in the commonly accepted sense of the word) - The brwoser will set aside the JS task and start the DOM task, the timeout will not interrupt that, but be delayed. –  Eugen Rieck Feb 28 '12 at 22:41
    
Wait, so is this solution better or James Hay's? James' is much harder to read since it's recursive. Which one should I use? –  Tony R Feb 28 '12 at 22:50
2  
They do different things. If you're not worried about the freeze and just want the overlay use this one. If you don't want the page to freeze use my one. –  James Hay Feb 28 '12 at 22:54

You need to put your loop inside a set timeout so that it doesn't hold up the page. Even if your overlay is displayed, nobody likes their page freezing

var counter = 0;
function rebuild() {
    showOverlay();
    doWork();
}
function doWork() {
    if(counter < 9000){
        // append element
        counter++;
        setTimeout(function(){
            doWork();
        },10);
    }
    else {
        hideOverlay();
    }
}

EDIT: This answer will actually take significantly longer to process the page though. Somewhere in the realm of 90 seconds which is pretty unacceptable, the other alternative could be to set a timeout every 100 iterations, which will add about 1 sec to the total load time, but should stop the page from freezing.

function doWork() {
    if(counter < 9000){
        // append element
        if(counter % 100 == 0) {
            setTimeout(function(){
                doWork();
            },10);
            counter++;
        }
        else {
            doWork();
            counter++;
        }
    }
    else {
        hideOverlay();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't this just delaying the whole thing by 10 milliseconds? Seems to me there is still a 9000-iteration loop going on. –  Tony R Feb 28 '12 at 22:36
    
Oh I see now, it gives the previous iteration 10 milliseconds before starting the next... Hmm I will try it! –  Tony R Feb 28 '12 at 22:38
    
Yeah try my second one, that first one will take forever. –  James Hay Feb 28 '12 at 22:41
    
This will delay EVERY iteration, which is 9000*10ms or 90 seconds. This is unnecessary. –  Eugen Rieck Feb 28 '12 at 22:42
1  
Well if 9000 iterations takes a few seconds, 3 for example, it means that it will be free for interaction 30 times every second, which may make a noticeable difference to the 'freezing' part of the page. The fact that further javascript is preventing from processing is not the issue. You just want to prevent the UI from being frozen completely. Try it out and see, or if IE support doesn't matter, use those web workers. –  James Hay Feb 29 '12 at 1:18

The other answers show how to do this in a "pseudo-threading" way, using timers.

In the meantime I have learned about Web Workers, which are a threading solution that separates script execution from DOM updates.

They are currently supported in WebKit and Firefox, and support is planned for IE 10.

share|improve this answer
    
Web workers do not have access to the DOM. The solution is good, but I am afraid, it doesn't fit the problem. –  Eugen Rieck Mar 23 at 17:54

you could try this:

var loopCount = 0,
    build = function() {

    var frgm = document.createDocumentFragment();
    for (var i = 0; i < 200 && loopCount < 9000; i++) {
        // some codes
        frgm.appendChild(someElement);
        loopCount ++;
    }
    parentNode.appendChild(frgm);

    if (loopCount < 9000) {
         setTimeout(build, 10);
    }
};

function rebuild() {
  showOverlay();    // The overlay never appears...
  build();
  hideOverlay();
}
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