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Just started learning Ruby metaprogramming. Looking at Object.methods I get:

Object.methods => [
:allocate, 
:new, 
:superclass, 
:freeze, 
:===, 
:==, 
:<=>, 
:<, 
:<=, 
:>, 
:>=, 
:to_s, 
:included_modules, 
:include?, 
:name, 
:ancestors, 
:instance_methods, 
:public_instance_methods, 
:protected_instance_methods, 
:private_instance_methods, 
:constants, 
:const_get, 
:const_set, 
:const_defined?, 
:const_missing, 
:class_variables, 
:remove_class_variable, 
:class_variable_get, 
:class_variable_set, 
:class_variable_defined?, 
:module_exec, 
:class_exec, 
:module_eval, 
:class_eval, 
:method_defined?, 
:public_method_defined?, 
:private_method_defined?, 
:protected_method_defined?, 
:public_class_method, 
:private_class_method, 
:autoload, 
:autoload?, 
:instance_method, 
:public_instance_method, 
:nil?, 
:=~, 
:!~, 
:eql?, 
:hash, 
:class, 
:singleton_class, 
:clone, 
:dup, 
:initialize_dup, 
:initialize_clone, 
:taint, 
:tainted?, 
:untaint, 
:untrust, 
:untrusted?, 
:trust, 
:frozen?, 
:inspect, 
:methods, 
:singleton_methods, 
:protected_methods, 
:private_methods, 
:public_methods, 
:instance_variables, 
:instance_variable_get, 
:instance_variable_set, 
:instance_variable_defined?, 
:instance_of?, 
:kind_of?, 
:is_a?, 
:tap, 
:send, 
:public_send, 
:respond_to?, 
:respond_to_missing?, 
:extend, 
:display, 
:method, 
:public_method, 
:define_singleton_method, 
:__id__, 
:object_id, 
:to_enum, 
:enum_for, 
:equal?, 
:!, 
:!=, 
:instance_eval, 
:instance_exec, 
:__send__]

Is there a list of methods that are useful for metaprogramming? Such as instance_eval, initialize and method_missing?

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If metaprogramming Ruby is a serious interest, I strongly recommend the Metaprogramming Ruby book by Paolo Perrotta. –  sarnold Feb 28 '12 at 22:34
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is the top answer from this page :

Method-related hooks

method_missing
method_added
singleton_method_added
method_removed
singleton_method_removed
method_undefined
singleton_method_undefined

Class & Module Hooks

inherited
append_features
included
extend_object
extended
initialize_copy
const_missing

Marshalling Hooks

marshal_dump
marshal_load

Coercion Hooks

coerce
induced_from
to_xxx

Also, check this blog post for explanations and sample code for many of these methods.

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Note that these are great hooks, but do not include things like instance_eval or define_method. –  Phrogz Feb 28 '12 at 23:32
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Object is a class, so most of the methods you listed are actually Class instance methods. Look also at Object.private_methods -- you will find define_method in there, which is absolutely essential. But binding is very powerful too... when learning about Ruby metaprogramming, you'll want to look at the docs for the Binding class. The send, __send__, and public_send family is also essential.

Looking at the above list, you should be able to identify the "reflection" methods which can be used to query and manipulate constants, methods, instance variables, and so on programmatically. Then there are the eval and exec methods. method_missing is one of the first ones you learn, but pay attention to const_missing also. Make sure to check out set_trace_func and trace_var. And where would we be without alias and alias_method?

Then there are the interpreter "hooks" like method_added, method_removed, method_undefined, inherited, extended, included, singleton_method_added, singleton_method_removed, singleton_method_undefined, instance_method_added, instance_method_removed, and instance_method_undefined.

Object#method is essential for getting Method objects. Look at all the methods of Method, including things like owner. Kernel#caller can be useful sometimes. Then also look up the ObjectSpace class.

Understand that although they have some special behavior, classes and modules are just objects and you can create them dynamically, store them in data structures, etc. They don't even have to have names. You can just call Class.new to make a new one and use class_eval, define_method, etc. as needed to add methods to it.

__LINE__ and __FILE__ can be interesting, especially File.read(__FILE__).

Understanding blocks and lambdas well is important both for general Ruby programming, and for metaprogramming in particular.

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In the book "Metaprogramming Ruby", the author states that there's no firm line between metaprogramming and programming. It's all just programming.

Some examples I can think of that are somewhat in-between programming and metaprogramming are class and attr_reader.

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