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I realize this looks similar to other questions about checking if a file exists, but it is different. I'm trying to figure out how to check that a type of file exists and exit if it doesn't. The code I tried originally is this:

filenames = os.listdir(os.curdir)

for filename in filenames:

   if os.path.isfile(filename) and filename.endswith('.fna'):
        ##do stuff

This works to 'do stuff' to the file that ends in .fna, but I need it to check and make sure the .fna file is there and exit the program entirely if not.

I tried this:

try:

    if os.path.isfile(filename) and filename.endswith('.fna'):
        ## Do stuff 
except: 

    sys.stderr.write (‘No database file found. Exiting program. /n’)
    sys.exit(-1)

But that didn't work, it just skips the whole function if the .fna file isn't there, without printing the error.

share|improve this question
    
And you have a typo in your singly-quotation mark –  Felix Yan Feb 29 '12 at 1:49
    
And a weird non-escape sequence /n. –  Amadan Feb 29 '12 at 1:52

6 Answers 6

The for statement in Python has a little-known else clause:

for filename in filenames:
    if os.path.isfile(filename) and filename.endswith(".fna"):
        # do stuff
        break
else:
    sys.stderr.write ('No database file found. Exiting program. \n')
    sys.exit(-1)

The else clause is run only if the for statement runs through its whole enumeration without executing the break inside the loop.

share|improve this answer

Look at the glob module:

databases = filter(os.path.isfile, glob.glob('./*.fna'))
# if not databases, print error message and die, otherwise loop over it.
share|improve this answer
    
How pythonic is that, uh? –  Unpaid Oracles Feb 29 '12 at 2:24
filenames = os.listdir(os.curdir)
found = False
for filename in filenames:
    if os.path.isfile(filename) and filename.endswith('.fna'):
        found = True
if not found:
    sys.stderr.write ('No database file found. Exiting program. \n')
    sys.exit(-1)
share|improve this answer

If you are using exceptions, do not test to see if the file exists. That's why you're using exceptions to start with.

try:
    # No if statement doing the check
    # Start doing stuff assuming abc.fna exists
except:
    # Uh oh! Something went bad.
    # Display error messages, clean up, carry on

To clarify, consider the code snippet:

try:
    with open('hi.txt') as f:
        print f.readlines()
except:
    print 'There is no hi.txt!'
share|improve this answer

Your try/except block didn't work because os.path.isfile does not throw an exception if it fails; it merely returns False.

else clauses for for loops are weird and non-intuitive. Using break to signify that the loop was successful rather than legitimately breaking it is just weird, and contrary to Python's philosophy.

Here's a nice, Pythonic way of doing what you want:

want = lambda f: os.path.isfile(f) and f.endswith(".fna")
valid_files = [f for f in os.listdir(os.curdir) if want(f)]
if len(valid_files) == 0:
    print >>sys.stderr, "failed to find .fna files!"
    sys.exit(1)
for filename in valid_files:
    # do stuff
share|improve this answer

Check out os.path.splitext(path) function which says:

Split the pathname path into a pair (root, ext) such that root + ext == path, and ext is empty or begins with a period and contains at most one period. Leading periods on the basename are ignored; splitext('.cshrc') returns ('.cshrc', '').

Here's an example:

>>> os.path.splitext("./01The News from Lake Wobegon/AlbumArtSmall.jpg")
('./01The News from Lake Wobegon/AlbumArtSmall', '.jpg')
>>> 
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