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The C++11 standard includes a new method to hardcode vectors. And using it, I hardcoded this data in int main():

std::vector <std::vector <double> > A = {{1, 2, 3, 1}, {2, 5, 4, 2}, {1, 4, 7, 3}, {1, 7, 9, 1}};

however, when i add this line:

std::vector <std::vector <double> > b = {{1}, {2}, {3}, {4}};

under the first line, CodeBlocks/GCC says: internal compiler error: Segmentation fault

why?

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closed as too localized by Tim Post Mar 14 '12 at 11:17

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
works with gcc version 4.6.2 – perreal Feb 29 '12 at 2:00
5  
Time to update your compiler! – R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 29 '12 at 2:08
    
C++11 support is experimental, still, with GCC. – nerozehl Feb 29 '12 at 2:58
    
Best call this "literal initialisation" or something, not "hard-coding" – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 14 '12 at 10:32
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Internal compiler error means that gcc crashed during the compilation process. That looks like a gcc bug. Which gcc version do you use?

Per your comment, the solution is very likely to upgrade your compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
im using gcc 4.4.1 – calccrypto Feb 29 '12 at 2:01
1  
@calccrypto: Then you should upgrade your compiler to one that isn't broken. – Nicol Bolas Feb 29 '12 at 2:13
    
and file a bug report – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 14 '12 at 10:33

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