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How would I implement an Array of Hashtables in c++?

I have a hashtable class with a constructor that looks like this:

explicit ChainingHashTable( const HashedObj & notFound, int size = 101 );

So I attempted making an array of these hashtables by doing:

static ChainingHashTable<int> answers[5] = { {0, 500}, {0, 500}, {0, 500}, {0, 500}, {0, 500} };

however, I get the following errors & warnings:

browser.cpp:106:71: warning: extended initializer lists only available with -std=c++0x or -std=gnu++0x [enabled by default]
browser.cpp:106:71: error: converting to ‘ChainingHashTable<int>’ from initializer list would use explicit constructor ‘ChainingHashTable<HashedObj>::ChainingHashTable(const HashedObj&, int) [with HashedObj = int]’

I can't use a different compiler since this is for a class assignment, but what am I doing incorrectly? What's the proper syntax?

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It is being created in a class/object, so additionally, how would I initialize it in the constructor? –  kabirpong Feb 29 '12 at 3:07
    
possible duplicate of Initialize a static member ( an array) in C++ –  Ben Voigt Feb 29 '12 at 3:07
    
The simplest solution is avoiding the problem: do not use arrays, but rather vectors. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 29 '12 at 3:18
    
@David: That doesn't help with initialization pre-C++11. –  Ben Voigt Feb 29 '12 at 3:46
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you tried

static ChainingHashTable<int> answers[5] = { ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500), ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500), ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500), ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500), ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500) };

?


Above is the method for a global variable. For a static class member, the declaration and definition must be separate:

class SomeClass
{
    static ChainingHashTable<int> answers[5];
};

and in one compilation unit (so not inside a header)

ChainingHashTable<int> SomeClass::answers[5] = { ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500), ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500), ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500), ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500), ChainingHashTable<int>(0, 500) };
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I tried inserting that just now, but I get a whole new error: –  kabirpong Feb 29 '12 at 3:05
    
browser.h:33:38: error: a brace-enclosed initializer is not allowed here before ‘{’ token In file included from browser.cpp:3:0: browser.h:33:199: error: ISO C++ forbids initialization of member ‘answers’ [-fpermissive] browser.h:33:199: error: making ‘answers’ static [-fpermissive] browser.h:33:199: error: invalid in-class initialization of static data member of non-integral type ‘ChainingHashTable<int> [5]’ –  kabirpong Feb 29 '12 at 3:05
    
@kabirpong: Oh, now I see that this is a member variable. You didn't say that anywhere in the question and it's very important! –  Ben Voigt Feb 29 '12 at 3:07
    
My bad guys! I realized it had to be a member variable after I posted the question. –  kabirpong Feb 29 '12 at 3:07
    
I tried what was done in the other answer you posted, but I'm confused about one detail: How would I write the declaration? the compiler keeps comlpaining about the lack of a constructor –  kabirpong Feb 29 '12 at 3:12
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The compiler is telling you that the code you are trying to write is C++11.

You could use Boost.Assignment

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And his instructor is going to test with a compiler that doesn't support C++11, so how does this "answer" help? –  Ben Voigt Feb 29 '12 at 2:50
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