Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My laptop has 2 logical processors and I stumbled upon the scenario where if I schedule 2 tasks that take longer than 1 second without designating them long-running, subsequent tasks are started after 1 second has elapsed. It is possible to change this timeout?

I know normal tasks should be short-running - much shorter than a second if possible - I'm just wondering I am seeing hard-coded TPL behavior or if I can influence this behavior in any way other than designating tasks long-running.

This Console app method should demonstrate the behavior for a machine with any number of processors:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var timer = new Stopwatch();
    timer.Start();

    int numberOfTasks = Environment.ProcessorCount;

    var rudeTasks = new List<Task>();
    var shortTasks = new List<Task>();

    for (int index = 0; index < numberOfTasks; index++)
    {
        int capturedIndex = index;
        rudeTasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Starting rude task {0} at {1}ms", capturedIndex, timer.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            Thread.Sleep(5000);
        }));
    }

    for (int index = 0; index < numberOfTasks; index++)
    {
        int capturedIndex = index;
        shortTasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Short-running task {0} running at {1}ms", capturedIndex, timer.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        }));
    }

    Task.WaitAll(shortTasks.ToArray());
    Console.WriteLine("Finished waiting for short tasks at {0}ms", timer.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    Task.WaitAll(rudeTasks.ToArray());
    Console.WriteLine("Finished waiting for rude tasks at {0}ms", timer.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

Here is the app's output on my 2 proc laptop:

Starting rude task 0 at 2ms
Starting rude task 1 at 2ms
Short-running task 0 running at 1002ms
Short-running task 1 running at 1002ms
Finished waiting for short tasks at 1002ms
Finished waiting for rude tasks at 5004ms

Press any key to continue . . .

The lines:

Short-running task 0 running at 1002ms
Short-running task 1 running at 1002ms

indicate that there is a 1 second timeout or something of that nature allowing the shorter-running tasks to get scheduled over the 'rude' tasks. That's what I'm inquiring about.

share|improve this question
    
Please post a description of the misbehavior. –  Adam Robinson Feb 29 '12 at 4:36
    
@AdamRobinson Hi Adam, the first paragraph describes the behavior I am seeing - I am uncertain if I should call it "misbehavior" but I would like to know if I can affect this behavior in any way, or if I need to adjust my expectations and approach to using the TPL –  ZeroBugBounce Feb 29 '12 at 4:44
    
Sorry, I meant some sample output demonstrating what you're describing. I'm not exactly clear what it is you're describing, but seeing your console output might make that clearer. –  Adam Robinson Feb 29 '12 at 4:46
    
@AdamRobinson Also, I would be very happy for suggestions how I could have posed this question more effectively. –  ZeroBugBounce Feb 29 '12 at 4:46
    
@AdamRobinson Okay, I added the output - thanks! –  ZeroBugBounce Feb 29 '12 at 4:48
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The behavior that you are seeing is not specific to the TPL, it's specific to the TPL's default scheduler. The scheduler is attempting to increase the number of threads so that those two that are running don't "hog" the CPU and choke out the others. It's also helpful in avoiding deadlock situations if the two that are running start and wait on Tasks themselves.

If you want to change the scheduling behavior, you might want to look into implementing your own TaskScheduler.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is standard behavior for the threadpool scheduler. It tries to keep the number of active threads equal to the number of cores. But can't do the job really well when your tasks do a lot of blocking instead of running. Sleeping in your case. Twice a second it allows another thread to run to try to work down the backlog. Seems like you have a dual-core cpu.

The proper workaround is to use TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning so the scheduler uses a regular Thread instead of a threadpool thread. An improper workaround is to use ThreadPool.SetMinThreads. But you should perhaps focus on doing real work in your tasks, Sleep() is not a very good simulation of that.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The problem is it takes a while for the scheduler to start the new tasks as it tries to determine if a task is long-running. You can tell the TPL that a task is long running as a parameter of the task:

for (int index = 0; index < numberOfTasks; index++)
{
    int capturedIndex = index;
    rudeTasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Starting rude task {0} at {1}ms", capturedIndex, timer.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        Thread.Sleep(3000);
    }, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning));
}

Resulting in:

Starting rude task 0 at 11ms
Starting rude task 1 at 13ms
Starting rude task 2 at 15ms
Starting rude task 3 at 19ms
Short-running task 0 running at 45ms
Short-running task 1 running at 45ms
Short-running task 2 running at 45ms
Short-running task 3 running at 45ms
Finished waiting for short tasks at 46ms
Finished waiting for rude tasks at 3019ms
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.