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Is there a good way to pass a time stamp between C++ and .net so that when it arrives in .net the delta is worthwhile.

My initial look into this is that the high performance timer uses CPU cycles, while the .net time methods use something else? (I'm not really sure on this point).

I'm looking for some guidance/suggestions here. The main goal is that a low level request is received by a C++ program it does some kind of processing, control is passed to some .NET code, and then further on again to more .NET code, and along the way a map of values is also passed, so in the C++ portion I'd like to collect a begin/end timestamp, and then another begin and end timestamp as it passes through the pipe line, but I need the timestamps to make sense.

That is to be more or less based on the same clock. How can I do this -- I'm probably missing something really simple here I think.

Edit: Added note about precision requirement

I am aware of C++/CLI, but I guess from what I've found so far (and maybe I am wrong here) is that the high-precision timer measures CPU cycles, and .NET Stopwatch.Elapsed is not CPU time. I need something that can be more accurate than 15ms which I think is the precision of the time() C function. Something compatible with Stopwatch.Elapsed time would be the most useful. I apologize that I'm not more specific on the C++ portion -- my C++ is very rusty.

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I would recommend using a string and a datetime format which you can parse from c++ and .Net easily. Strings are easy to pass, I know you can use DateTime.Parse(string) to get the value on the c# side. –  Developer Feb 29 '12 at 6:15

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Just do it. Are you aware or using C++/CLI? I use if for this low levlel kind of work because I can jsut handle with .NET objects in C++. Actually I can write .NET classes in C++.

C++/CLI is the perfect solution for interacting C++ and .NET code.

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I am aware of C++/CLI, but I guess from what I've found so far (and maybe I am wrong here) is that the high-precision timer measures CPU cycles, and .NET is not CPU time. I need something that can be more accurate than 15ms which I think is the precision of the time() C function. Adding this comment to the question in general -- since I didn't mention this point. –  lucidquiet Feb 29 '12 at 6:27

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