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Because calling a flush() to get every entities persist from memory to database. So if I use call too much unnecessary flush(), it could take much time therefore not a good choice for the performance. Here is a scenario that I don't know when to call a flush()?

//Order and Item have Bidirectional Relationships
Order ord = New ord("my first order");
Item item = New Item("tv",10);

//...process item and ord object

em.persist(ord);//em is an instance of EntityManager
em.flush();// No.1 flush()

item.setOrder(ord);
em.persist(item);

Set<Item> items= new HashSet<Item>();
items.add(item);
ord.setItems(items);

em.flush();// No.2 flush()

My question is: calling of the No.1 flush could be avoid or not?

The things I worried is: in order to do the item.setOrder(ord), we need an database id of ord. And calling only em.persist(ord) cannot generate an database id, so I have to call the em.flush() before item.setOrder(ord). So what's your opinion guys?

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

i should first construct the structure, and after that persist everything.

Order ord = New ord("my first order");
Item item = New Item("tv",10);

item.setOrder(ord);

Set<Item> items= new HashSet<Item>();
items.add(item);
ord.setItems(items);

em.persist(ord);

In this way, you persist the whole tree in one call and is flush not needed.

In good object design, you should use the way duffymo described to wire your objects.

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Thank you Salandur! yes, I think I could do the constrction of the objects in transient status and persist the parent (if in the mapping file, the children collections are set cascade). Finally I could do the flush(). –  Kewei Jun 5 '09 at 16:28
    
did you say flush() is not neccesary? –  Jaime Hablutzel Jun 17 '11 at 2:40

I think you should be doing all this in a transactional context and let it handle these issues for you.

You need to embed the bidirectional relationship in the objects:

class Parent
{
    private List<Child> children;

    public boolean addChild(Child c)
    {
        c.setParent(this); // this is the key piece

        return this.children.add(c);
    }
}

class Child
{
   private Parent parent;

   public void setParent(Parent p)
   {
      this.parent = p;
   }
}
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Thanks, you are right! and your embed the bidirectional relationship can makes my code clear now! –  Kewei Jun 5 '09 at 16:25

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