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Suppose I have 2 files with the following format.

File1:

username <username>
password <password1>
password <password2>
hello world

File2:

username hello
password test
password testing
hello world
good luck

I want to be able to check that File2 follows the same format as File1. This means that if a file with the following format, will not be able to pass in my test.

BadFile:

username hello
password test
hello world

There must be exactly 2 lines that starts with "password". Currently, my program is able to check if there are lines starting with "username" and "password". I can't seems to be able to check that if File1 has duplicate lines with the same starting word(s) of "password", it should also check that File2 should have the same number of lines with the same starting word(s). ie. My program will generate a pass when I run File1 and BadFile to test if BadFile follows the format of File1.

I do not need to store the stuff after the keywords (ie. "hello", "test", "testing" in this case) but I should be able to distinguish that there are 2 lines starting with "password" for me to check.

There are also lines that do not have "<...>". Basically, whatever that is in File1 must be found in FileN for FileN to pass.

Any idea what data structure I should use to achieve that? I'm thinking of hash of arrays but it seems too complicated for me and for this case.

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2 Answers 2

my $template_qfn = ...;
my $file_qfn     = ...;

my $template = do {
   open(my $fh, '<', $template_qfn) or die $!;
   local $/;
   <$fh>
};

my $template_pat = quotemeta($template);
$template_pat =~ s/\\<[^<>\n]*\\>/[^\n]+/g;
my $template_re = qr/^$template_pat\z/;

my $file = do {
   open(my $fh, '<', $file_qfn) or die $!;
   local $/;
   <$fh>
};

die("File \"$file_qfn\" doesn't match template \"$template_qfn\"\n")
   if $file !~ $template_re;
share|improve this answer
    
What about cases like "hello world" where I do not have "<...>"? –  Sakura Feb 29 '12 at 7:46
    
It's checked, like you asked. –  ikegami Feb 29 '12 at 7:51
    
Tested. Fixed a bug. –  ikegami Feb 29 '12 at 7:55
    
However, if there is an extra line in File2 (in this case, "good luck"), the test should still pass and not fail. This is because whatever that is in File1 must be found in FileN for FileN to pass. But not all things in FileN must be found in File1. What if the order is different in File1 and FileN? –  Sakura Feb 29 '12 at 8:20
    
@Sakura, That directly contradicts your spec. ("whatever that is in File1 must be found in FileN for FileN to pass." and "it should also check that File2 should have the same number of lines with the same starting word(s).") If you want us to ignore some lines, you'll need to say which lines you want to ignore. –  ikegami Feb 29 '12 at 14:46

this is a piece of code that may helps you (substitute DATA by open a file):

use strict;
my @tokens = qw/username password password/;
my $current = 0;
my $line_number = 1;

while( my $line = <DATA> ) {
    my $expected = $tokens[$current];
    if( $line !~ m!^$expected ! ) {
        die "Invalid format: expected '$expected' at data file line number: $line_number; line: $line"
    }
    $current = ++$current % scalar(@tokens);
    $line_number++;
}

die "Invalid format; sequence incomplete" if $current != 0;
print "Ok!\n";

__DATA__
username hello
password test
password testing
share|improve this answer
    
What about cases like "hello world" where I do not have "<...>"? –  Sakura Feb 29 '12 at 7:50

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