Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <vector>

struct blah {
    int member;
};

int main (int argc, const char* argv[])
{
    blah a = { 1 };
    auto are_same = std::bind(
            std::equal_to<blah>(),
            a,
            std::mem_fn(&blah::member)   // Obviously not a function, but I tried.
        );

    std::vector<blah> blahs = { {0}, {1}, {2} };
    return static_cast<int>(std::any_of(blahs.begin(), blahs.end(), are_same));
}

This program fails to compile (GCC 4.4):

error: no match for call to ‘(std::equal_to<blah>) (blah&, std::_Mem_fn<int blah::*>&)’

Aside from coding the loop myself, what's the correct way to check for equivalence based on a data member?

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to check generally for equality of blahs or do you just want to check a single member for equality? If the former, implement operator== for the struct. –  Peter Wood Feb 29 '12 at 9:32
    
I'm looking to examine specific data members. –  Andres Jaan Tack Feb 29 '12 at 12:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're already using C++11, why not use a lambda?

int main (int argc, const char* argv[])
{
    blah a = { 1 };
    auto are_same = [=](blah const& b) -> bool {
        return a.member == b.member;
    };

    std::vector<blah> blahs = { {0}, {1}, {2} };
    return static_cast<int>(std::any_of(blahs.begin(), blahs.end(), are_same));
}

If you can't use lambdas, you can use bind to do function composition:

using namespace std::placeholders;
auto are_same = std::bind(
  std::equal_to<int>(),
  std::bind(&blah::member, _1),
  std::bind(&blah::member, a)
);
share|improve this answer
    
This is of course correct. Unfortunately, I'm targeting gcc4.4 for the short term future. –  Andres Jaan Tack Feb 29 '12 at 12:12
1  
@AndresJaanTack Added the form using bind composition, it works with GCC 4.6.1, don't know aobut 4.4 as I don't have it at hand. –  Pablo Feb 29 '12 at 17:05
    
Seems then that I am yet limited by my compiler. :( –  Andres Jaan Tack Mar 1 '12 at 7:11

Aside from coding the loop myself, what's the correct way to check for equivalence based on a data member?

Normal way of checking for equivalence is to implement the operator==. In your case, I guess it would look like this :

bool operator==( const blah & lho, const blah & rho )
{
  return ( lho.member == rho.member );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Eh, this is true for like 60% of cases, but for generated code and "look for an element with this attribute" searches, as the above, sadly inapplicable. –  Andres Jaan Tack Feb 29 '12 at 12:11

mem_fn is defined as follows:

template<class Ret, class Ty>
    unspecified mem_fn(Ret Ty::*pm);

Ret

The return type of the wrapped function.

Ty

The type of the member function pointer.

so

you cannot use &blah::member here, its not a function

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.