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I have an "updates" table that can contain duplicate descriptions, and I would like to return the duplicates along with their count, so I created this query:

SELECT description, count(description) AS count
FROM updates INNER JOIN participations ON participations.update_id = updates.id
INNER JOIN customer ON customer.id = participations.customer_id
INNER JOIN garages ON garages.id = customer.garage_id
WHERE (updates.created_at >= DATE_SUB(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 6 MONTH))
AND garages.`id` = 1
GROUP BY description
ORDER BY count desc
LIMIT 10

The counts returned were not what I was expecting. I believe the reason why is because many customers can share an update, so I am getting duplicates because of the actual duplicates in the table, and because the same update record is being returned multiple times. How can I fix the query so that it only counts the actual duplicate description fields in the update table. Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might rewrite your query to use EXISTS because you need customers just to get to garage :-)

SELECT description, count(description) AS count
FROM updates
WHERE (updates.created_at >= DATE_SUB(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 6 MONTH))
AND EXISTS (select null from participations INNER JOIN customer ON customer.id = participations.customer_id WHERE participations.update_id = updates.id AND customer.garage_id = 1)
GROUP BY description
ORDER BY count desc
LIMIT 10
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That's great Nikola, worked a treat, thanks. I wonder if you would be kind enough to talk me through it? particularly "EXISTS" and "select null" thanks –  pingu Feb 29 '12 at 22:13
1  
You are welcome. Exists tests if subquery returns any records, so we use it to ensure that "participants" come from garage 1. Subquery connects to main query by filtering participations.update_id = updates.id. As for null, we don't actually need any data from those records, just their existence; hence we return single column of nulls. This is probably not that important performance-wise, because sql engine will not select any data, but it is good to leave a reminder to oneself that we do not actually select anything. –  Nikola Markovinović Mar 1 '12 at 0:05
    
Thanks very much! –  pingu Mar 1 '12 at 8:13
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