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What is the best way to deal with the following situation?

Suppose that I have something that should behave like this

class Foo
    {
    public:
         Foo(Bar& bar):m_bar(bar){}
    private:
         Bar& m_bar;
    };

Foo:s must have a valid reference to Bar:s. Also different Foo:s needs different or the same Bar:s.

I want to store Foo:s in an array. However, since Foo will require a non-default constructor, it will not work.

I could create an array of pointers to Foo:s, but then I need to call new and delete for each object in that array.

I could define Foo like this instead

class Foo
    {
    public:
         void init(Bar& bar)
             {
             m_bar=&bar;
             }
    private:
         Bar* m_bar;
    };

, but then it is possible to create uninitialized Foo:s.

What about some sort of placement new?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, sorry for my first answer I got the question wrong. Here is a better solution I hope: you can create a vector of elements without default constructor like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;


class Foo 
{ 
public: 
    Foo(int& bar): m_pBar(bar)
    { } 

    Foo& operator=(const Foo& other)
    { m_pBar = other.m_pBar;  }

    int Get()
    { return m_pBar; }

private: 
    int& m_pBar; 
}; 


int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int test[10]  = { 0 };

    vector<Foo> vect;
    for (int& i: test)
        vect.emplace_back(i);

    test[0] = 1;
    cout << vect[0].Get() << endl;

    return 0;
}
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But if Foo also contains a BLOb which I do not want to copy? –  user877329 Feb 29 '12 at 9:17
    
I am not sure where you see the copying here. Be careful about anticipated optimization as well. First, the "copy" will probably be optimized by the compiler in a "move", second it's probably not that slow, third you may use a reference for Blob as well ... –  J.N. Feb 29 '12 at 9:51
    
Well, the assignment operator copies data from ´other´ into ´*this´. When I say BLOb, I mean something that might be some megs. –  user877329 Feb 29 '12 at 12:03
    
Then it is more than justified to use a smart pointer or reference for blob that will be light to copy. –  J.N. Feb 29 '12 at 15:05

You could use pointers still but instead of using raw pointers use unique_ptrs. These are available in c++11, but if you are using an older compiler you could use the boost implementation.

For example

class Foo
{
public:
  Foo(unique_ptr<Bar> bar):m_pBar(bar){}
private:
  unique_ptr<Bar> m_pBar;
};

This way you don't have to worry about calling delete on your Bar objects as they are deleted once there are no more references to them.

Then you can use Foo like this

unique_ptr<Bar> pBar(new Bar());
Foo(pBar);

EDIT: Changed to use unique_ptr instead of shared_ptr and added example usage

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I think unique_ptr would be preferable. There's no need to share the data among many threads. –  J.N. Feb 29 '12 at 8:42
    
agreed. I'll change my answer to reflect this. –  Jim Jeffries Feb 29 '12 at 8:43
    
it still causes new to be called for each object, doesn't it? –  user877329 Feb 29 '12 at 8:49
    
Yes, you'd still need to call new, changed my answer to show example –  Jim Jeffries Feb 29 '12 at 8:51
    
But I wanted an array of Foo:s and the class Foo unchanged. Do you mean unique_ptr<Foo> foos=new unique_ptr<Foo>[n] –  user877329 Feb 29 '12 at 8:56

Finally I implemented a custom container with the following constructor:

template<class T>
template<class U,class V>
Array<T>::Array(unsigned int n,U source_iterator,const V& source_resource):memory(n*sizeof(T))
    {
    data=(T*)memory.pointerGet();
    unsigned int k;
    try
        {
        for(k=0;k<n;k++)
            {
            new(data+k)T(*source_iterator,source_resource);
            ++source_iterator;
            }
        }
    catch(...)
        {
        while(k>0)
             {
             k--;
             data[k].~T();
             }
        throw;
        }
    length=n;
    capacity=n;
}
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