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Why is a Id == 999999 faster than a lambda expression driven comparison using a Predicate?

Maybe my test itself is not 100% the same, but this is just a sample to show something about a general question: Is a predicate slower than a common Id == 999999 ?

The predicate takes 150 ms while the common compare has 125 ms. From where comes the

difference/overhead? You might ask why I care for 25 ms. Well... I use a open type predicate also in a hierarchical find method and there the gap is much larger.

So I guess the lambda (creating for each "u" a delegate) + predicate is the problem? If not what is wrong with my setup?

   public class UtilitiesTest
        {
            [Test]
            public void Go()
            {
                var units = GetUnits();
                DateTime d = DateTime.Now;         
                var item = units.testme<MyUnit>(u => u.Id == 999999);

                TimeSpan t = DateTime.Now - d;

                Debug.WriteLine(t.TotalMilliseconds + " ms");


                var units1 = GetUnits();
                DateTime d1 = DateTime.Now;  

                MyUnit item1 = null;
                foreach (MyUnit unit in units1)
                {
                    if (unit.Id == 999999)
                    {
                        item1 = unit;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                TimeSpan t1 = DateTime.Now - d1;
                Debug.WriteLine(t1.TotalMilliseconds + " ms");
            }

            private IEnumerable<MyUnit> GetUnits()
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)          
                    yield return new MyUnit() { Id = i };            
            }        
        }

        class MyUnit
        {
            public int Id { get; set; }
        }

    public static T testme<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Predicate<T> condition) where T : class
            {
                foreach (T item in source)
                {
                    if (condition(item))
                    {
                        return item;
                    }
                }
                return default(T);
            }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think there is a small difference in speed, but my first point would be that there are a few things I'd improve on in your test. When constructing these micro benchmark tests, it is important to always observe a few rules:

  1. When timing, use a Stopwatch instead of DateTime - it has a higher resolution and is more precise.
  2. Always make sure you warm up all code under test once before running it. Otherwise the first bit of code will have a tendency to run slower as it bears the majority cost of JIT'ing
  3. Always run the test multiple times (you have done this in your example).

If I rework your test, I end up with something like this:

public void Go()
{
    // warmup
    Test_Equality();
    Test_Lambda();

    // timed tests
    Console.WriteLine(Test_Equality() + " ms");
    Console.WriteLine(Test_Lambda() + " ms");
}

public long Test_Lambda()
{
    var units1 = GetUnits();
    var stopWatch1 = new Stopwatch();
    stopWatch1.Start();
    MyUnit item1 = units1.testme<MyUnit>(u => u.Id == 999999);
    return stopWatch1.ElapsedMilliseconds;
}

public long Test_Equality()
{
    var units2 = GetUnits();
    var stopWatch2 = new Stopwatch();
    stopWatch2.Start();
    MyUnit item2;
    foreach (MyUnit unit in units2)
    {
        if (unit.Id == 999999)
        {
            item2 = unit;
            break;
        }
    }

    return stopWatch2.ElapsedMilliseconds;
}

I run this, I get figures that are roughly this:

Test_Lambda: 68 ms 
Test_Equality: 53 ms

Overall though, I would expect there to be a small performance hit when calling the delegate/lambda version over the native call, in the same way that there is a small performance hit to calling a method via a delegate rather than calling the method directly. Behind the scenes, the compiler is generating extra code to support these lambda version of your test.

Ultimately it is generating something along the lines of this:

public class PossibleLambdaImpl
{
    public bool Comparison(MyUnit myUnit)
    {
        return myUnit.Id == 9999999;
    }
}

Therefore, your lambda test is actually calling a method on a compiler generated class every time it evaluates.

In fact - when I change your equality test to instead create the above PossibleLambdaImpl class once, and call PossibleLambdaImpl.Comparison each time round the loop, I get almost identical results to the lambda case:

public long Test_PossibleLambdaImpl()
{
    var units2 = GetUnits();
    var stopWatch2 = new Stopwatch();
    stopWatch2.Start();
    MyUnit item2;
    var possibleLambdaImpl = new PossibleLambdaImpl();
    foreach (MyUnit unit in units2)
    {
        if (possibleLambdaImpl.Comparison(unit))
        {
            item2 = unit;
            break;
        }
    }
    return stopWatch2.ElapsedMilliseconds;
}

[Note: there are others on this site who know far more about this than me - but roughly speaking I believe this is correct]

In any case, the thing to remember is that this performance difference is tiny. Micro-benchmarks like this always accentuate the difference. There may be a 10%-20% performance difference between them according to your test, but if your real-life code only spends 0.001% of its time making this sort of call (for example) then this amounts to an absolutely tiny difference in executing code.

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I believe your method names are switched. the Test_Lambda method has no Lambdas and the Test_Equality method has lambda –  Stilgar Feb 29 '12 at 9:07
    
@Stilgar - already fixed it - but well spotted. Last minute change to make the code more readable went wrong! –  Rob Levine Feb 29 '12 at 9:09
    
@Stilgar Rob needed 25 secs to edit it :P –  Pascal Feb 29 '12 at 9:10
    
@Rob Yes I also thought about using StopWatch but wasn`t sure wether there is really a difference. Yeah I run it multiple times. Ok you improved my test but the percentual difference 53 ms to 68 ms is like 125 ms to 150 ms so the misery is still there... I would need an answer what exactly makes that 15 ms (68-53). Lambda creating delegate and predicate? If yes you have any source link I can read or can this be refactored again maybe to make it faster? I have a generic tree with 4 open types units,modules,member etc. I want to unit test + use one generic extension method instead of 4 concrete. –  Pascal Feb 29 '12 at 9:14
1  
I don't see how the number of cores can relate to the performance of this single thread program :) –  Stilgar Feb 29 '12 at 9:37

I would expect the delegate to be slower. After all the delegate argument should be loaded in register or whatever and then a method call should be performed which is one more jump instruction. Why do you expect them to be the same?

share|improve this answer
    
I do not really expect as I see the difference. I just want to know why. –  Pascal Feb 29 '12 at 9:51
    
Because the machine needs to call the method which means that several cycles will be spent there. The delegate cannot be inlined like a regular method. –  Stilgar Feb 29 '12 at 10:06

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